“Anyone” referring to inanimate objects

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Ascolippo

New Member
Portuguese
I couldn’t find this specific inquiry anywhere and it made me wonder if I used it in a correct manner.

I was talking to a friend when he asked me the question:

“What college has classes after the end of april?”

I replied: “anyone that is not from where you live, perhaps”

The logic I applied in this case was imagine answering it in another form such as: “the one/the ones that is/are not from where you live, perhaps”.

The indefinite pronoun “anyone” is used to refer to person, but can it be used to refer to objects in specific situations? If not, what should I’ve used?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It would make more sense to say “any one” (two words), meaning “any [one] of the colleges that…”.

    But your answer is perplexing anyway. It’s unclear what you mean by “not from where you live”.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In AE, your statement is not correct.

    The indefinite pronoun “anyone” is used to refer to person, but can it be used to refer to objects in specific situations?
    No, it cannot. "Anyone" means roughly "any one person". It cannot replace all uses of "one".

    If not, what should I’ve used?
    I was talking to a friend when he asked me the question:
    “What college has classes after the end of april?”
    I replied: “anyone that is not from where you live, perhaps”
    Perhaps every college that is not near you.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think you can use "anyone" to refer to inanimate objects. If it is important that you are just referring to one thing, then use "any one" for things: "Which one would you like?"/"Oh, any one of them would be fine". If you aren't referring to specifically one thing, then use "any" without "one" (or in this case, as dojibear says, "every").
     
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