“gurgled out” of the far-right <fringe> of the Indiana legislature.

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "fringe" here mean "a group with extremist views"(WRF)?


Thanks in advance
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The Religious Freedom Restoration Act, Oesterle said, “was not an issue of Pence’s creation”—it had “gurgled out” of the far-right fringe of the Indiana legislature. But, he added, “there was a lack of leadership.”

-New Yorker

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  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    No, it means (WR dictionary): a marginal part: society's fringes.

    ...the far-right edge of the Indiana legislature.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I've never seen the word used with any kind of positive connotation. It is inevitably more negative than "extremist" and, you could argue, has echoes of "the lunatic fringe".
     

    andrewg927

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I've never seen the word used with any kind of positive connotation. It is inevitably more negative than "extremist" and, you could argue, has echoes of "the lunatic fringe".
    I have never heard "extremist" used in a positive light but a "fringe group" just means they are very much out of the mainstream. I don't see it as inherently negative.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Whether or not "fringe" is used negatively depends on context. It's "far right" that provides the negativity.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    News to me. It is certainly an interesting cultural phenomenon and something that really doesn't exist in the US in such a solidity, with or without the name. I'm pretty sure if the same term were used in AE it would be seen as highly ironic, casting the whole enterprise in a dubious light.
     
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