“Most” and “the most” as adverbs referred directly to the verb

GiuseppeDini

New Member
Italian - Italy
I’ve been browsing to no avail the web in search of clear rules about how to express the concept of a verb that is intended to the maximum extend among all possible choices.
For example which one is correct?

The film I like the most is X.
The film I like most is X.
The film I most like is X.

The comedian which makes me laugh the most is Toto.
The comedian which makes me laugh most is Toto.
The comedian which makes me most laugh is Toto.

Among all friends Alice was the one who laughed the most.
Among all friends Alice was the one who laughed most.
Among all friends Alice was the one who most laughed.

Which genre are you interested the most?
Which genre are you interested most?
Which genre are you most interested?

Thank you.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The ones with 'most' and 'the most' in the same place are both correct: that is, the first and second of each group. (We need to fix a couple of other things: comedian who or that, and interested in.) 'The film I most like' is also natural, as is 'most interested in', but in that one 'most' is qualifying an adjective. I'm not sure why the third option doesn't work in the other two. Why :tick:'I most like' but not :cross:'I most laughed'?
     

    GiuseppeDini

    New Member
    Italian - Italy
    The ones with 'most' and 'the most' in the same place are both correct: that is, the first and second of each group. (We need to fix a couple of other things: comedian who or that, and interested in.) 'The film I most like' is also natural, as is 'most interested in', but in that one 'most' is qualifying an adjective. I'm not sure why the third option doesn't work in the other two. Why :tick:'I most like' but not :cross:'I most laughed'?
    Thank you for your answer and sorry for those silly mistakes.
    What I cannot understand is if "the most"/"most" options are perfectly interchangeble or ther's some subtle difference of meaning between them.
     
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