“Romantic poetry” has to the popular mind become almost....

sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
Because of the prominence of landscape in this period, “Romantic poetry” has to the popular mind become almost synonymous with “nature poetry.” Neither Romantic theory nor practice, however, justifies the opinion that the aim of this poetry was description for its own sake.

Source: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, The Romantic Period (1785-1830), The Novel

Hello teachers,

You know what makes me confused? The blue part makes me confused. Because after it (hast to) we should
use a verb. For example: “She has to study”
But in the text I’ve posted, there is no verb after has to and the structure looks incorrect and doesn’t make sense
to me. Would you please clarify it to me? In my opinion it’s a typo and (to) should be omitted. But what do you
think of that?

Many thanks in advance.
 
  • Liam Lew's

    Senior Member
    Because of the prominence of landscape in this period, “Romantic poetry” has to the popular mind become almost synonymous with “nature poetry.”
    You know what makes me confused? The blue part makes me confused. Because after it (hast to) we should
    use a verb. For example: “She has to study”
    There actually is a verb. We are not dealing with the structure "have to + verb", but we are dealing with the present perfect. And we have an insertion "to the popular mind", which probably confuses you. Maybe comma would have helped to wipe out confusion.

    .........., Romantic poetry has, to the popular mind, become almost synonymous with nature poetry.
     
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