“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ -George Bernard Shaw

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Julie4luck

Member
Korean
Hi,

These lines are for George Bernard Shaw' play <Back to Methuselah>:
“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never
were; and I say, ‘Why not?’”

I was wondering what the above blue texts are meaning. I am confused-"You see things" means
1)"You see everything as it is/as it appears before your eyes", and you say "Why is it so?"
or
2) "You see visual hallucinations/or imagine things that are not really there(existed in the past)", and you say "what are they?"

I understood the phrase as 1) first, but some dictionaries say "see things" means like 2), sort of idiom.
I would like to translate and understand it from English to Korean.

Thanks,
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Expanded quote:
    I hear you say "Why?" Always "Why?" You see things; and you say "Why?" But I dream things that never were; and I say "Why not?"

    Some people question everything they see and wonder why it exists, while others imagine things that don’t exist and wonder why they couldn’t exist (if only we put our minds to making them happen).
     
    Last edited:

    Julie4luck

    Member
    Korean
    Expanded quote:
    I hear you say "Why?" Always "Why?" You see things; and you say "Why?" But I dream things that never were; and I say "Why not?"

    Some people question everything they see and wonder why it exists. while others imagine things that don’t exist and wonder why they couldn’t exist (if only we put our minds to making them happen).
    Thanks for your good help!
     
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