…so sorry to make you feel sick. Maybe you can avoid talking

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I was talking to someone who might think my spoken English is better than him and he is jealous. Then he said my voice made him feel sick. I then say:

I feel so sorry to make you feel sick. Maybe you can avoid talking to me.

I wonder if this is an idiomatic response?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not sure what you understand by 'idiomatic', so perhaps you could tell us. Whilst you're at it, which specific part of your string of words do you want to ask about?

    As you know, we don't engage in wholesale proofreading.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    I'm not sure what you understand by 'idiomatic', so perhaps you could tell us. Whilst you're at it, which specific part of your string of words do you want to ask about?

    As you know, we don't engage in wholesale proofreading.
    I know. I am looking for an expression to answer him. So would you please recommend? When I say idiomatic, I mean the sentence is both grammatically correct and sounds fine to native English speakers' ears.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hello, Beryl.

    Do you mean that there isn't an expression for my situation? If so, My question is that I wonder if "Maybe you can avoiding talking to me" is idiomatic.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hello, JS.

    I know what you mean. But I've done this several times. Do you mean I need to post a new thread?
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    As you might imagine, there are many ways of expressing this idea, and the most suitable choice is always a function of the circumstances - the context.

    "Maybe you can avoiding talking to me" is not unimaginable. What effect are you hoping to create? Do you just want them to go away? Do you actually want them to stop talking to you? Are you aiming for sarcasm? Do you want to hurt their feelings?
    You seem to be looking for an expression that your imagined interlocutor may not be capable of understanding, given that you tell us that their English is inferior to your own.

    (Cross-posted, probably ... thought so)
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    As you might imagine, there are many ways of expressing this idea, and the most suitable choice is always a function of the circumstances - the context.

    "Maybe you can avoiding talking to me" is not unimaginable. What effect are you hoping to create? Do you just want them to go away? Do you actually want them to stop talking to you? Are you aiming for sarcasm? Do you want to hurt their feelings?
    You seem to be looking for an expression that your imagined interlocutor may not be capable of understanding, given that you tell us that their English is inferior to your own.

    (Cross-posted, probably ... thought so)
    By reading your questions, I seem to understand where my problem is.

    I want him to stop talking to me and I also want a morsel of sarcasm. Thanks a lot for your couple of questions, it's much clearer.
     
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