陸: りく, おか

furrykef

Senior Member
English (United States)
I have this sentence:

私たちは舟を降りて、陸に上がったんだ。

I was expecting 陸 to be read りく, but it was read おか. Is there any difference in nuance or meaning between them?
 
  • wathavy

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    陸 should be read りく not おか。
    But in some cases like what you see, they alter the reading intentionally so the reader feel somewhat odd.
    女 is read ひと instead of おんな for example.
    There are that sort so many and I am not very proficient on those.
    Cheers.
     

    furrykef

    Senior Member
    English (United States)
    How would you write おか in this sentence, then? (The given translation was, "We got out of the boat and stepped onto shore.") Or would you use りく and avoid おか entirely?
     

    Wishfull

    Banned
    Japanese
    Hello.
    We've learned the standard reading at school. We've learned that "陸” is read as "riku" at elementary school.
    So I think "riku" is the basic reading, as Wathavy said.
    But in our daily life, they're interchangeable, depend upon each individual's preference, because the meaning is exactly the same.

    In some idiomatic phrases, it would be read as "oka".
    For example,
    陸にあがった河童(おかにあがったかっぱ)  (慣用句の読み方として「りく」とは読まないようです。)


    In other expression, it is interchangeable and depends on preference.
    船頭多くして船陸にのぼる(せんどうおおくして船おかにのぼる) (「りく」でも「おか」でもよいのではないかと思います。この文章では私は「おか」と読みます。
    正しくは「山(やま)にのぼる」であって、高い高度の陸地にまでのぼってしまう、という意味では、「おか」と発音したほうが、丘や岡(hill)を連想するので、なんとなく、「おか」の方が良いと思っています。)

    ひょっとすると、水中、海中、海上と陸地を区別する時に、高い陸地(山、丘)をイメージする場合が「おか」で、遠浅の砂浜から上陸するような平地をイメージする場合が「りく」かな、と思ってみましたが、どうもそうでもないようです。



    (例)人間は進化の過程で、太古の昔に海から陸に上がったのです。(りく・おか→どちらでもよいと思います。)
    (例)ビーバーは通常水中で生活しますが、たまに陸に上がります。(りく・おか→どちらでもよいと思います。)
    (御質問の文)私たちは舟を降りて、陸に上がったんだ。(りく・おか→どちらでもよいと思います。)
    (例)コロンブスは新大陸を発見し、注意しつつ陸にあがってみた。(りく・おか→どちらでもよいと思います。)

    私の結論は、多くの場合はどちらでもよく、ご質問の文章もどちらで読んでも間違いではないと思います。
    異論がある方、ぜひ、教えてください。
     

    wathavy

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    How would you write おか in this sentence, then? (The given translation was, "We got out of the boat and stepped onto shore.") Or would you use りく and avoid おか entirely?
    As Wishfull is mentioning, those are widely accepted that way, I guess.
    But I might simply mistake as 丘 instead of 陸, if I hear おか.
    It could be my personal feeling.
     

    mikun

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi,
    It is said that 2 different entry methods were used when we started to use kanji letters in Japanese society.
    1. To use kanji as a similar pronounciation symbol. for example '左官- さかん:a person who make walls from mud and wood'. There are no meaning correlation.
    2. To use kanji as a similar meaning symbol. for example '経済- economics'. There are no correlation of pronounciation.

    陸 is a counterpart of 海 In formal writing, but it feels a little bit unrelaxed in usual conversation, and I use 'oka' in that relaxed situation as a conterpart of 海. This 'oka' is not a original meaning of '岡(small mountain)', but a meaning of '陸'. So, I feel '陸(oka)' kanji word is better fit in that situation as a counter part word of '海.
    This is a No2 entry case of kanji. I don't feel much discontent in this using.
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    hedomodo
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    True, a well-known dictionary deals with the word oka in two entries (「大辞泉」 s.v. おか【丘/岡】 and おか【陸】), but the listed senses are clearly manifestations of a core meaning in different contexts. I think oka, no matter where it is used and how it is represented in the Japanese scripts, means a huge landmass. When used in a context that puts it contrary to the ocean, it shares the semantic field with the Sino-Japanese word/morpheme riku and written out as 陸. In reference to a geographic elevation on top of a flat land, oka is close to 丘 and 岡 and represented by them in written forms.

    Now, Sino-Japanese words/morphemes are very active part of the Modern Japanese vocabulary in that they form numerous words loaned from European languages. In case of riku (陸), we have:
    大陸 (tairiku [great land: continent])
    陸軍 (rikugun [land corps: army])
    陸路 (rikuro [land route])
    着陸 (chakuriku [arriving on land: landing])
    水陸両用車 (suirikuryōyōsha [water-land both-used wheels: amphibian (vehicle)])

    It is a morpheme for technical terms and oka is a word for everyday life. No wonder old sayings such as the one Wishfull quoted above use oka instead of riku. Nowadays the general term for "land as opposed to sea" is riku, due largely to many technical terms, but oka is frequently used in this sense by those whose daily life has a lot to with sea.

    furrykef, if the author of your text prefers oka to riku, maybe the speaker of the sentence is someone who knows ocean very well, such as a fisherman or a sailor.
     

    wathavy

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    One sentence all of you mentioned,
    'Oka ni agatta kaeru.' or 'Oka ni agatta kappa.'
    陸に上がった河童(蛙)
    I am not sure if the sentence are properly written, though.
    These cannot be Riku, I guess.
     

    Flaminius

    hedomodo
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    I seem to understand you are saying that the script representation 陸 is misleading because the saying uses oka. The same force of tradition that has passed it on to our time, however, allows oka to be written as 陸. :)
     
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