0.5 inch/0.5 inches/half an inch/a half of an inch

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Tremt

Member
Portuguese
What do you guys suggest?

- 0.5 inch
- 0.5 inches

E.g. He mentioned that the measurement went up to 0.5 inch/inches.

Also, would the non-numerical spelling be:

- half an inch
- a half of an inch

Thanks you guys! :)
 
Last edited:
  • Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Your sentence doesn't make sense.
    However I guess that you mean that his hair was 0.5 inches/half an inch long?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    We use the numerical version at work all the time. We write it as such: 3.5"; 3.50"; 3.500". Although all the dimensions are the same the measurement tolerance changes with the addition of the zeros. We never write "inch" or "inches"; we always use the " sign.

    When we use fractional measurements like 1/2" or 1/4" the tolerances are usually in fractions and are usually much larger tolerances than the numerical ones. So the choice of numerical or fractional is not a casual choice.
     

    Tremt

    Member
    Portuguese
    Your sentence doesn't make sense.
    However I guess that you mean that his hair was 0.5 inches/half an inch long?
    Apologies, I just came up with the first example to use that came to my mind. Just go with the edited version.

    Thanks.
     

    Tremt

    Member
    Portuguese
    We use the numerical version at work all the time. We write it as such: 3.5"; 3.50"; 3.500". Although all the dimensions are the same the measurement tolerance changes with the addition of the zeros. We never write "inch" or "inches"; we always use the " sign.

    When we use fractional measurements like 1/2" or 1/4" the tolerances are usually in fractions and are usually much larger tolerances than the numerical ones. So the choice of numerical or fractional is not a casual choice.
    I see, the problem is that I am writing a text which is for non-native speakers of English and I am using inches as they'd use in their language. I have to have inch/inches in its letter form and no fractions as otherwise I do agree in using your suggested form.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Are you writing or speaking it?

    I would expect to see 0.5" or 0.5 in. in informal writing - the symbol or abbreviated form is common, and people often can't be bothered to put in ½ .

    In speech, I would expect people to say 'half an inch' (even if written 0.5") most of the time, but if they say it in decimals, then it would be '(zero/nought/oh) point five inches'.
     

    Tremt

    Member
    Portuguese
    Are you writing or speaking it?

    I would expect to see 0.5" or 0.5 in. in informal writing - the symbol or abbreviated form is common, and people often can't be bothered to put in ½ .

    In speech, I would expect people to say 'half an inch' (even if written 0.5") most of the time, but if they say it in decimals, then it would be '(zero/nought/oh) point five inches'.
    Thank you, I am writing the text for people whose second language is English or who can speak it at conversational level. It is supposed to be a formal text and I am trying to use the inch word instead of " to denote "inch". In the native language of the people I am writing the English text for, they use centimeters, not inches, but I am including inches albeit I want to use the most easy to recognize wording, which would be as asked in my first post.

    Considering all of the above, shall I write 0.5 inch or 0.5 inches?

    Thank you all and sorry to be a bit of a pain ;)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Considering all of the above, shall I write 0.5 inch or 0.5 inches?
    If you want the English to be just like what they will encounter in written English outside the text you are writing, I recommend you use the normal, conventional way that nat suggested, of 0.5 inches.

    Here's some threads from another discussion
     

    Tremt

    Member
    Portuguese
    If you want the English to be just like what they will encounter in written English outside the text you are writing, I recommend you use the normal, conventional way that nat suggested, of 0.5 inches.

    Here's some threads from another discussion
    That was so useful, thank you :) (shame this forum doesn't have a thank you button).
     

    neal41

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If you want the English to be just like what they will encounter in written English outside the text you are writing, I recommend you use the normal, conventional way that nat suggested, of 0.5 inches.

    Here's some threads from another discussion
    In fact what nat recommended was 0.5" or 0.5 in. He put a period after 'in'. I think it would be better to omit the period. Feet, by the way, are designated by a single quote or 'ft'. 0.5' or 0.5 ft is half a foot. For people accustomed to using the metric system, it may not be obvious that double quotes means inches. I think that 'in' and 'ft' may be your best choice.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    ...
    I am trying to use the inch word instead of " to denote "inch".

    Considering all of the above, shall I write 0.5 inch or 0.5 inches?
    but if they say it in decimals, then it would be '(zero/nought/oh) point five inches'.
    In fact what nat recommended was 0.5" or 0.5 in. He put a period after 'in'. I think it would be better to omit the period. Feet, by the way, are designated by a single quote or 'ft'. 0.5' or 0.5 ft is half a foot. For people accustomed to using the metric system, it may not be obvious that double quotes means inches. I think that 'in' and 'ft' may be your best choice.
    Sorry if I wasn't clear on what I meant.
    I accepted that Tremt wanted to use the whole word inch and asked for specific advice in whether it should be plural when spelled out. I jumped to the end of Nat's post where he recommended inches - based on the selection of plural as discussed in that thread I linked.
     
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