$1.135,0 million [1 billion or 1 million?] (numbers)

Cindy_bm

New Member
Portuguese-Brazil
Hi,

I am trying to understand what is the correct understanding of this amount: $1.135,0 million.
Is it 1 billion or 1 million?
Does anybody have a link or text to recommend, so I can study how to understand this?

Thank you.
 
  • Askorti

    New Member
    Polish
    To me it is simply one billion, 135 million USD and 0 cents. (If you include the million you wrote after the numbers)
    If you were to put it in a full form, it would look like this: $1.135.000.000,0.
    It is written like this because normally you write a dot every three numerals starting from the end, and you separate full numbers from decimals with a comma.
    But I'm no expert nor a native, so it would be nice if someone was to confirm it.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    An investment fund probably manages more than $1.135 million ($1,135,000)—two or three big investors could have that much among them.
    In AE (and also in BE, I'm fairly sure), five-thousand two-hundred eighty dollars and sixty-six cents is "$5,280.66", and not "$5.280,66" as in some other languages.
    So, as JustKate said, the "." and the "," are confusing.
    If the last punctuation were ",", I would expect three digits after it; and if ".", I would expect two digits (for cents—but such precision is unlikely here).
    So the single digit after punctuation looks like a typo.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Does the original have that comma between the 5 and the 0 or is that just a little typo? I ask because it's confusing me.
    To me it is simply one billion, 135 million USD and 0 cents. (If you include the million you wrote after the numbers)
    If you were to put it in a full form, it would look like this: $1.135.000.000,0.
    It's confusing to JustKate (and me) because in the US, it would be $1,135 million, or written in full, $1,135,000,000.00 (note the reversal of the comma and decimal point, and, in the full version only, two digits after the decimal point).

    That would be read as Askorti says.

    Edit: In the alternative, it could be 1.135 million, but as Cenozite says, that would seem to be an absurdly small number in this context.
     

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    I agree with the others. It is either a typo or written in the numeral system that the following countries use:
    1.234.567,89
    Austria, Brazil, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Indonesia, Italy, Netherlands (currency), Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovenia, Spain (older), Sweden (not recommended)
    Source : en.wikipedia.org : decimal mark
     

    kgildner

    Member
    English - Ottawa Valley
    We had this exact same problem at work the other day. I work in Germany for a company whose language of business is English, and all corporate publications thus need to be translated. The German decimal system "1.135,0 mio. €" means €1,135,000,000 (€1.135 billion in English), but is often incorrectly translated as €1.135 million. It's difficult to clear up small mistakes like this unless you have direct contact with the accounting department. But the "thousand million" formulation is somewhat awkward in English anyways -- at least in the body text.
     

    Whirl

    Member
    English - US
    Hi,

    I am trying to understand what is the correct understanding of this amount: $1.135,0 million.
    Is it 1 billion or 1 million?
    Does anybody have a link or text to recommend, so I can study how to understand this?

    Thank you.
    With all the proof reading and the interesting rules and regulations surrounding such documents:

    one million, one hundred thirty-five thousand dollars.

    Check the company's web page for errata.
     
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