1 = yes / 2 = no ===>?

sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
Hello,
I chat a lot but there is something which has confused me many times.
When I or anyone who takes the microphone in a chat-room to talk to people, he/she first says this sentence:

Hello, do you here me?

Then, if people in the chat-room hear his/her voice, type 1.
And if the speaker has already taken the microphone but his/her voice is breaking up or is not audible and people can not hear him/her, then people in the chat room type 2.

in chat rooms:
1 = we can hear you
2 = we can not hear you or your voice is breaking up

This is my question: Do you know that from where this [1] or [2] originates? Do they mean yes/no in some conditions?

Thank you
 
  • jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I have never observed people doing this. I use Teamspeak (a group chat program) on an almost daily basis for casual communication. Yours sounds like a practical convention, but I wonder if it's a convention limited to a certain set of online groups.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    Yeah, I think it's something newly invented but I wonder how thousands of people know this practical convention. It's Paltalk Messenger. Full of chat rooms. Almost all of the people say it. For example:
    Jennifer: "Do you hear me guys?"
    Alex: "22222222222222222"
    John: "222222"
    Jessica: "22"
    Jack: "2222222222"
    Sarah: "222222"
    Means, no we can't. Maybe Jennifer's microphone is damaged. Then, I wonder how this convention is invented.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I've never seen this in person, but this simple code is referenced in countless movies. For example, one of the characters won't be able to speak for some reason or other, and the person trying to talk to him will say "Blink once for yes and twice for no." I've never been to a seance either, but in movies, the medium will tell the spirit, "Knock once for yes and twice for no." This certainly sounds related, doesn't it?
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    I've never seen this in person, but this simple code is referenced in countless movies. For example, one of the characters won't be able to speak for some reason or other, and the person trying to talk to him will say "Blink once for yes and twice for no." I've never been to a seance either, but in movies, the medium will tell the spirit, "Knock once for yes and twice for no." This certainly sounds related, doesn't it?
    Useful guidance. Yeah, I think so. Thank you Justkate.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    If you don't hear someone, how do you know that you should type "2?"
    Suppose that the admin of the room types or says into the microphone "Egmont, how are you? Long time no see. Egmont please take the microphone. We want to hear you."
    Then you type: "Hey guys, ok"
    After a second, you take the microphone and we see a sign which says to all users in the chat room that Egmont is on the microphone. When the users in the chat-room see that you are on the microphone but you are not audible, then right away they type: "Egmont, 2222222222222" or "Egmont, 2" or just "2" or "2222222222"
    They all mean that Egmont you are on the mic but we can't hear you.

    But if your microphone is not damaged and people can hear you:
    You say: "Hi guys, do you hear me"
    Then they say: "Egmont, 11111111111" or "Egmont, 1" or just "1" or "11111111"
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Something like this is used here by stores, banks, and other businesses with computer-answered telephones. They will say something like, "If you want to know the balance in your account, press 1. For all other business, press 2." (Once you have done this, you will get another question, again answered by pressing numbers on your phone.)
     
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