10 (divided) by 2 is 5

BLUE1308

Senior Member
Mazahua
Hello!

Excuse me, when we are talking about mathematics, especially divisions, is it possible to say: 10÷5 = 2

"Ten (divided) by five is/equals two"

Is it possible to omit the "divided"? Or do I have to use it always?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • BLUE1308

    Senior Member
    Mazahua
    You need to say "divided." How else would we know that you are dividing these numbers, rather than (for example) multiplying them?
    Ok, thank you very much!

    So I always need to say "X divided by Y equals W".

    If I'm talking about a multiplication (10x2=20), do I have to say: Ten multiplied by 2 equals twenty? Could I also replace "multiplied by" for "times", so it would be "Ten times 2 is/equals 20"?

    Thank you!
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Answering BLUE1308's questions first: In mathematics, division is often read as 'over': a / b is 'a over b'. Multiplication is usually read as 'times', as in 'ten times two'.

    Now the other: The 4% death rate is the result of dividing 3245 by 80 928. So 3245 / 80 928 = about 0.04. (Normally with whole numbers we'd more commonly expect to divide the bigger one by the smaller one, but your sentence correctly does it the other way round, to get a rate.)
     

    Shooting Stars

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Now the other: The 4% death rate is the result of dividing 3245 by 80 928. So 3245 / 80 928 = about 0.04. (Normally with whole numbers we'd more commonly expect to divide the bigger one by the smaller one, but your sentence correctly does it the other way round, to get a rate.)
    2=10÷5. So this equation is read as "Two divides ten by five". Am I right?
    Thank you.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, your news story sentence is using the verb 'divide' and 'by', but it's not reading out an equation. That is said 'two equals ten divided by five'.
     

    Shooting Stars

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No, your news story sentence is using the verb 'divide' and 'by', but it's not reading out an equation.
    (the four per cent death rate )which divides deaths in China (3,245) by confirmed cases (80,928)
    I think "which" refers to 4%. Let's focus on the subordinate clause. That is
    0.04 divides 3,245 by 80928.
    Is this what the writer tries to say? If it is not an equation, what does it means? I am totally confused.

    Thank you.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think the relative pronoun which refers to death rate. That relative clause defines 'death rate'.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    (the four per cent death rate )which divides deaths in China (3,245) by confirmed cases (80,928)
    I think "which" refers to 4%. Let's focus on the subordinate clause. That is
    0.04 divides 3,245 by 80928.
    Is this what the writer tries to say? If it is not an equation, what does it means? I am totally confused.

    Thank you.
    <I think "which" refers to 4%.>
    No. It refers to "the 4% death rate" which divides the number of deaths by the number of cases. A relative pronoun cannot refer to an adjective (4%) The text tells you how the death rate is calculated - 3,245 divided by 80,928 = 0.04 (or 4%).
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The quotient is the death rate. You work this out by dividing the dividend/numerator (3,245) by the the divisor/denominator (80,928).
     

    BLUE1308

    Senior Member
    Mazahua
    Answering BLUE1308's questions first: In mathematics, division is often read as 'over': a / b is 'a over b'. Multiplication is usually read as 'times', as in 'ten times two'.

    Now the other: The 4% death rate is the result of dividing 3245 by 80 928. So 3245 / 80 928 = about 0.04. (Normally with whole numbers we'd more commonly expect to divide the bigger one by the smaller one, but your sentence correctly does it the other way round, to get a rate.)
    So can I say "10÷5=2" "Ten over five is two"?

    Thank you to all of you for your contributions!
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If it is not an equation, what does it means?
    Equations are a different language from English. We can state mathematical information in other ways than "equations." It is similar to the way we can write a date as 2020-03-29 (in the language ISO 8601 (international standards organization date format)) and say March twenty-ninth, the year of our Lord two-thousand and twenty (or any of the other many ways to say today's date).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It is also lower than the four per cent death rate which divides deaths in China (3,245) by confirmed cases (80,928)
    I think some key words were omitted from this sentence and the word order is very poorly done.

    It is also lower than the four per cent death rate in China which is derived from dividing deaths (3,245) by confirmed cases (80,928)

    There are other ways to calculate death rates because confirmed cases are only a fraction of the total cases. China's death rate is really much lower. As are death rates elsewhere that only take into account confirmed cases, as if other cases don't exist.
     
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