1000 miles across for a quark...

trilussa

Member
italiano
Hi to all!!
As usual I'd be immensely grateful to you for explaining the meaning of the following phrase: Quarks are so small that a Hydrogen atom would have to be 1000 miles across for a quark to be this big. Thanks
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    What is the context of the sentence, trilussa? It sounds as though "this big" should have a reference, either in preceding text or in an illustration.
     

    trilussa

    Member
    italiano
    There are no further referencies in this contextual structure (taken in itself), anyway
    they are spoken about the atomic nucleus and the subparticles of the proton inside it are called quarks. The quarks contained in a proton are so small compared to the proton dimension that..... (from this the abovesaid sentence)
     
    Last edited:

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    In that case, it's a bit confusing. The writer is saying that quarks are so small that the hydrogen atom would have to be of X size in order for a quark to be of Y size, but apparently "Y size" is not defined,' unless -- as jsvillar suggests -- the reader is meant to understand that the period at the end of the sentence is "Y size."
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    We know that a hydrogen atom is very small. Imagine how many times it would have to grow to be 1600km in diameter. That is the same relationship with the size of a quark except that the quark is extremely small (but in approximately the same ratio).
     

    async_

    New Member
    Russian
    Did you say they were speaking, trissula? If you found it in a video, an audio recording or may be a tapescript of a lecture then the speaker could have made a gesture indicating the size of a quark in relation to a Hydrogen atom 1000 miles across.
     
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