12 to 13 feet at six above

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pacorramos

Member
Spanish - Spain
Please, could someone help me with this phrase? I don't understand the last part: what on earth does "12 to 13 feet at six above" mean?
Here's the context:

The timber was uniformly large; some of the pines measuring 22 feet in circumference, and 12 to 13 feet at six above.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • pacorramos

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains
    Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains by John Charles Frémont, John Torrey

    Note that the original sentence says "measuring 22 feet in circumference at the ground, and 12 to 13 feet at six above." which makes it clearer that it means "at six (feet) above (the ground)."
    Well, at the ground was lost on my quotation. Now it makes full sense. Thanks to everyone!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I looked on the internet for "measuring the girth of a tree" and typically trees seem to be measured at 4½ feet above ground level, not six feet. Exceptions are made for trees that split into major limbs at a lower level or for trees that have a bottle neck shape.

     

    pacorramos

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I looked on the internet for "measuring the girth of a tree" and typically trees seem to be measured at 4½ feet above ground level, not six feet. Exceptions are made for trees that split into major limbs at a lower level or for trees that have a bottle neck shape.

    Thank you for the information!
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I looked on the internet for "measuring the girth of a tree" and typically trees seem to be measured at 4½ feet above ground level, not six feet...
    That may be why this writer felt it was important to specify "at six above." A tree is typically a bit thicker at 4 1/2 feet (about 1.36m) above the ground than at six feet (about 1.82m) above it.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    That may be why this writer felt it was important to specify "at six above." A tree is typically a bit thicker at 4 1/2 feet (about 1.36m) above the ground than at six feet (about 1.82m) above it.
    That sounds like a very reasonable explanation. I guess in the tree business they would automatically understand that if it is not specified then the listed girth is at 4½ feet.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The authors are explorers in the 1840s, not people "in the tree business." ;)
    Then it is safe to assume that they were measuring the girth and not calculating the diameter.

    Let's see. The circumference is 37.7 feet, divided by 3.14159265359 equals...Hey Lewis, Clark are one of you guys good with numbers?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Then it is safe to assume that they were measuring the girth and not calculating the diameter.
    I think they had mathematics then. I was pointing out that a long discussion of the "standard" of measuring at 4.5 feet is neither here nor there.
    The question has already been answered.
     
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