13 years for TV and yet only 5 years for the Internet

MrRise

Senior Member
Russian
Hello, I have a text about the Internet, and there's a sentence where I see: yet + only.

To get the sentence I think I should write one stands before: In the begining it was used by academics, but in the 1990s its popularity boomed in a way that had never been seen before. To illustrate this, it took 38 years for radio to reach 50 millions users, 13 years for TV and yet only 5 years for the Internet!

I looke it up, but I haven't found what could fit here.

Perhaps in this sentence 'yet' is written to emphasize that for the Internet it took only 5 years, like: Wow! So little! When it had taken a lot more for others.

To show how one things differs from others, we can use 'yet'? I'll try to make a sentence: All the class has gotten bad grades, yet only Sam has gotten a good one. Is it right to use it so?

The main question of mine is: How would it differ with no yet in the sentence?

Would you explain this? Thank you a lot in advance! :)
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You have the answer in your blue text - it is only for emphasis.

    The relevant entry reads:

    1. (used to add emphasis to an adjective or adverb) even;
      even to a larger extent:We'll have to use yet greater strength.
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Yet" often says that <what comes next> contrasts with <what came before>, and is surprising for that reason:

    We submitted 50 entries, yet failed to win even once.
    She has dated many men, yet is still a virgin.
    He is handsome, wealthy, honest and sincere. He's the perfect husband, yet I do not want him.

    Your examples:

    All the class has gotten bad grades, yet only Sam has gotten a good one.:cross:
    All the class has gotten bad grades; only Sam has gotten a good one.:tick:
    (Using a semi-colon lets you combine two full sentences. A comma does not.)

    "Yet" is used to introduce something unexpected or unpredicted:
    Sam is a poor student, yet he got the best grade on the test.:tick:
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    As an adverb modifying an adjective, "yet" simply adds emphasis. But a different "yet" is used in the red text in post #1.

    Here "and yet" is a conjunction: "and yet (it took) only 5 years for the internet."

    That meaning is given as "nevertheless" in our dictionary. The dictionary includes these examples:

    The essay is good, yet it could be improved.
    she is strange yet (she is) kind
    I want to and yet I haven't the courage
     
    I'm not convinced, doji. The simplest path is not to add words, but analyze thus:

    yet
    yet/
    adverb
    adverb: yet

    1. still; even (used to emphasize increase or repetition).
      "snow, snow, and yet more snow"
      synonyms: even, still, further, in addition, additionally, besides, into the bargain, to boot, on top (of that)
      "he supplied yet more unsolicited advice"
    ===========

    "Yet" in the phrase 'yet only five years' is, in my opinion, an adverb.

    ===


    ==========
    It does not mean, here, nevertheless and does not introduce a clause. {The following, in my opinion, does NOT apply:}

    1. nevertheless; in spite of that.
      "every week she gets worse, and yet it could go on for years"
      synonyms: nevertheless, nonetheless, even so, but, however, still, notwithstanding, despite that, in spite of that, for all that, all the same, just the same, at the same time, be that as it may;
      archaic natheless
      "he was doing nothing, yet he appeared purposeful"
    conjunction
     
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