16 years on vs. 16 years later

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truce

Senior Member
Persian
Hi everyone,
What is the difference between "16 years on" and "16 years later" in the sentences below???

Conjoined twins separated at six weeks and given a one-in-a-million chance of survival are vying for a place at Oxbridge 16 years on.
Conjoined twins separated at six weeks and given a one-in-a-million chance of survival are vying for a place at Oxbridge 16 years later.


Source:
Conjoined twins given a one-in-a-million chance of survival are vying for a place at Oxbridge | Daily Mail Online
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    They mean the same, but "on" seems a slightly odd choice to me when the phrase is at the end of the clause rather than introducing it. However, I see that here it is a headline, where shorter words are usually preferred.
     

    truce

    Senior Member
    Persian
    They mean the same, but "on" seems a slightly odd choice to me when the phrase is at the end of the clause rather than introducing it. However, I see that here it is a headline, where shorter words are usually preferred.
    Thank you. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
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