"1984" George Orwell (now called Tuesday)

HiroAOKI

Member
Japanese
Hi, English Forum!

"ABRIDGED CLASSICS" written by John Atkinson is brief summaries of books.
It describes "1984" George Orwell as follows.

Vision of a dystopian future
(now called Tuesday)

I think it is a metaphor, but what does Tuesday mean in above sentence?

Hiro AOKI
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    He's saying we are now living in a dystopian future. So that describes every day, including Tuesdays.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with kentix.

    Tuesday is often thought of as the most ordinary day of the week. Monday is the first work day, Wednesday is mid-week so you are halfway through, Thursday is close to the weekend, and Friday is the last day of the work week and people often mark it by going out in the evening and so on. And the weekends are for enjoying yourself.
     

    HiroAOKI

    Member
    Japanese
    Cagey-san

    Your reply is very helpful for me to understand why "Tuesday" not "Wednesday" nor "Thursday" so on.
    Thank you!
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Tuesday is often thought of as the most ordinary day of the week
    I didn't know that, and I'm rather fond of Tuesdays myself, but now I realise why it should be so. I can imagine an office worker starting the week on Monday quite fresh and relaxed after a pleasant or exciting weekend. Then comes Tuesday—the beneficial effect of the weekend has already worn off, and the next one seems so far away...
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Vision of a dystopian future
    (now called Tuesday)
    Your reply is very helpful for me to understand why "Tuesday" not "Wednesday" nor "Thursday" so on.
    A lot of Western humour is based on the cultural meme of juxtaposing ideas in order to create incongruity.

    To understand the joke, you need to know the book: It is a story, as it says, of a dystopian future that describes, through the hero and narrator, the complete control of the population by fear and lies and a situation that will never change.

    This is incongruously set against "Tuesday" - a single random day in normal life.

    Jokes are strange things: if they are explained, they die.
     
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