2-hour delay / delay of 2 hours

PaoloFR1

Senior Member
Italian - Italy
Are both of these sentences correct? Do they have the same meaning?


The airplane suffered a 2-hour delay
The airplane suffered a delay of 2 hours


Thanks :)
 
  • Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The delay phrases both sound natural, yes. (Suffered, however, isn't the best choice of verb.)
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The correct preposition here is "by:" "The airplane was delayed by two hours," or nothing at all: "The airplane was delayed two hours." You can use "of" when you describe a delay as a noun - "a delay of two hours" - but not with the verb "to delay."
     

    Radioh

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    The correct preposition here is "by:" "The airplane was delayed by two hours," or nothing at all: "The airplane was delayed two hours." You can use "of" when you describe a delay as a noun - "a delay of two hours" - but not with the verb "to delay."
    Hello. I often hear "delay" used passively like that and can't be sure if I've heard it used actively. I mean, does "the bad weather delayed the flight by 2 hours" sound just as good? Btw, is it the plane or the flight that is delayed or both?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hello. I often hear "delay" used passively like that and can't be sure if I've heard it used actively. I mean, does "the bad weather delayed the flight by 2 two hours" sound just as good? Btw, is it the plane or the flight that is delayed or both?

    You can say either plane or flight when referring to a scheduled arrival of an aircraft.

    Note the gentle hints from other posters above that we generally write out whole numbers less than 10 and do not use digits for them in text. ;)
     
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