2 more days or 2 days longer?

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Kacy.H

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, everyone

could you tell me which one is right ?


last time I ordered a pair of sneakers at Amazon on a snowy day, and the delivery took 2 more days /2 days longer than usual to arrive.

Thanks
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Two days longer.
    Two more days is used when you are referring to something that is/was already taking place:
    I had been waiting three days already when Amazon told me it would take two more days.​
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Two days longer.
    Two more days is used when you are referring to something that is/was already taking place:
    I had been waiting three days already when Amazon told me it would take two more days.​
    I'm sorry. The tense you used in your example is too complicated for me, so I'm still confused.

    Did you mean if something is happening now, I use "two more days".
    If something happened in the past, I use "two days longer"

    Thanks
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    No, it does not matter whether it is in the present or the past in respect of now, but what whether it takes place before or after the time you are describing in the sentence.

    In your example, the sentence is set in the present and you are looking back to something that happened in the past, so you use 'two days longer'.

    If, instead, you are looking ahead to the future and the thing is already happening, use 'two more days'.
    The weather forecast says it will snow for two more days. (It is snowing already)​

    If the thing isn't happening at the moment, you use 'two days longer' even when looking ahead.
    Next year's holiday will be two days longer than this year's.​

    You can set a sentence in the past and look ahead. This is what I was doing in my earlier post, to give an example of using 'two more days' in your original situation. I did not mean to confuse you.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No, it does not matter whether it is in the present or the past in respect of now, but what whether it takes place before or after the time you are describing in the sentence.

    In your example, the sentence is set in the present and you are looking back to something that happened in the past, so you use 'two days longer'.

    If, instead, you are looking ahead to the future and the thing is already happening, use 'two more days'.
    The weather forecast says it will snow for two more days. (It is snowing already)​

    If the thing isn't happening at the moment, you use 'two days longer' even when looking ahead.
    Next year's holiday will be two days longer than this year's.​

    You can set a sentence in the past and look ahead. This is what I was doing in my earlier post, to give an example of using 'two more days' in your original situation. I did not mean to confuse you.
    Thank you so much for the detailed explanation.
     
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