2 o'clock pm ?

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sunnyweather

Senior Member
Polish
Have you ever come across telling the time this way: 2 o'clock pm ? I know you say 2 pm, 2 o'clock in the afternoon ao fourteen hundred (hours), but how about the way I asked about?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Unfortunately, I have seen this accursed way of telling time. Not very often, thankfully.

    A search with Google will reveal some errant souls.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Funny this question should come up. I had a whole afternoon of presentations where I told the students that they had 3 minutes. I brought a talking clock with me (I inadvertently turned the voice on), and it gave the students a shock when it announced 'three o'clock p m', 'four o'clock p m' and 'five o'clock p m'. (I assume the clock was made in China, but all the markings on it were in English.) It's not something I would say myself though.
     

    sunnyweather

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Dear folks,

    Thanks a million for your responses. I'm so glad I've discovered this forum. I had had no idea <something> like that existed. It's so nice there are poeple who seem to enjoy discussing matters connected with the English language. Before I just browsed countless dictionaries and reference books or kind of pestered the few native speakers of English I knew with my numerous questions. It's so good I can ask them here now. :)
     
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    angelene001

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Is it correct to say:
    1) It's 5 o'clock p.m.

    Or would it be better to say:
    2) It's 5 p.m.
    3) It's 5 o'clock in the afternoon.
     

    angelene001

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I saw 1) in the fourth grade student's notebook and felt that there was something wrong with it.
    Either he wrote it down incorrectly or the teacher made a mistake.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Moderator note: Angelene's thread (from post 11) has been merged with an earlier thread. Please scroll up for other members' responses.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I recall encountering it, and logically it should work (it has no greater redundancy than "five o'clock in the afternoon"), but it certainly isn't how people actually express the time nowadays, and English is not a logical language anyway:).
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    ... (it has no greater redundancy than "five o'clock in the afternoon"),
    What's redundant about that? At least I don't have to wake up before dawn.


    I suggest to my students that, if you start with symbols, finish with symbols, and if you start with words, finish with words. So 'It's 5 pm' or 'It's five o'clock in the afternoon'.
    I don't think 'It's 5 o'clock pm' is wrong, but it does jar a bit on my ear.
     
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