2 sentences for a history class

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by lourai*87, Jul 27, 2005.

  1. lourai*87 Member

    Australia
    Australia - English & studying French
    Hello....could anyone please give a gramatically correct translation of these sentences? It is purely for a school project in which i need to find some related text for my studies, nothing further. These sentences appears on a poster. I am sorry if this is a sensitive issue for anyone.

    "Jugen dient dem Führer"

    and

    "Alle zehnjährigen in die HJ"

    Please realise this is only for my studies from an historical point of view.
     
  2. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Those sentences appear wrong or incomplete. Where did you get them from? Please check the spelling and see if you have typed the complete text. Also, context would help. It's very difficult to help people without context. :(

    Gaer
     
  3. elroy

    elroy Imperfect Mod

    Chicago, IL
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I agree with Gaer. Context would be helpful. You should also give your thread a more informative title.

    Nevertheless, I will take a stab at these:

    (assuming you meant Führer and not Fuher)
    Boy serves the leader
    (judging from your references to the sensitivity of this issue, I'm assuming the "Führer" is Hitler.)

    (assuming you meant zehnjährigen and not zehnjahigen)
    All ten-year-olds (are to go) to the HJ
     
  4. lourai*87 Member

    Australia
    Australia - English & studying French
    Yes...i was referring to Hitler. I really did not want to offend anyone, which is why i didnt make a more descriptive title. The sentences appear on a recruitment poster for the Htler Youth.

    Apologies for the spelling errors. I do not know how to put the accents on letters =p Fuher was a mis-print.

    My question is answered now, your sentences make sense to me. Thank-you and sorry again. =)
     
  5. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Welcome to the forum, Lourai. I agree with Elroy and Gaer, but by the way do you know what HJ is? I don't know if "HY" exists in English. It means Hitler youth, for all who don't know it.

    Let me correct some sentences:

    "Jugend dient dem Führer!"
    Youth serves the Fuhrer/leader.

    and

    "Alle Zehnjährigen in die HJ!"
    All ten-years-old kids off to the "Hitler youth"
     
  6. elroy

    elroy Imperfect Mod

    Chicago, IL
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Oohh - I thought "Jugen" was supposed to be "Junge." If it's "Jugend," then "youth" is indeed more appropriate.

    As for the second sentence, "kids" is redundant, the "the" is superfluous, and the "Y" in "youth" should be capitalized. Nevertheless, I would not translate HJ. That said, I would stick with my version or go with your "off to" (either option is fine):

    All ten-year-olds off to HJ.
     
  7. MrMagoo

    MrMagoo Senior Member

    Westphalia, Germany
    Westphalia, Germany; German
    I agree with Daniel, it certainly is Jugend, not only Jungen,
    and I agree with elroy's translation.

    'Jugend dient dem Führer - Alle Zehnjährigen in die HJ'
    "Youth serves the Fuhrer - All ten-year-olds off to the HJ".


    Btw:
    I find it remarkable that - whenever a word is taken from German, the Umlaut just disappears; not even replaced by vowel+e. Best examples: Fuhrer, and Fraulein.
    I was told that even some German teachers in the US tell their kids that "Fraulein" is spelled without an Umlaut - weird... *hehe* sounds neat though.
     
  8. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Hitlerjugend or Hitler-Jugend=Hitler Youth, in English. No one will understand "HJ" in English who does not know German. And although the abbreviation may exist, I've seen the word written out in English.

    Who nailed the German (I knew one of you would), and Elroy's translation is fine. :)
    Also doppelganger. To me it's extremely annoying. But you will not always see these written incorrectly, and look at this:

    deja vu
    déjà vu

    I've seen both, although the second seems to be more common.
    Well, SOME teachers in the US are entirely incompetent and should be fired, Jens. This is about as logical as teaching that 2+2=5. I've never heard of any teachers (German) who are that bad, but they probably exist. :)

    Gaer
     
  9. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Yes, that's quite interesting, but consider this:

    Ergebnisse 1 - 10 von ungefähr 285.000 für doppelganger. (0,19 Sekunden)
    Ergebnisse 1 - 10 von ungefähr 200.000 für doppelgänger. (0,13 Sekunden)
    Ergebnisse 1 - 10 von ungefähr 201.000 für doppelgaenger. (0,10 Sekunden)

    That's sad. Our beatiful German word. :(
     
  10. lourai*87 Member

    Australia
    Australia - English & studying French
    Thank you everyone for your help. I am so sorry for all my spelling errors -- i must learn to proof-read before i submit my post! =p

    I discovered how to use the Umlauts also, as such i edited my first post. Thank you all again. And thank you to whoever changed the title of my thread =)

    Rach
     
  11. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    I can't get a valid search, because if I include an extra word "my doppelgänger", I'm getting hits based on "ä" and "a". :(

    Doppelgaenger does not bother me, since many people who type in English only do not have the special characters.

    Gaer
     
  12. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    I typed in "Doppelganger" and there were only English hits, but when I used an "ä" I got very much (almost only) German hits.

    Me neither, but it was a surprsing fact for me that "Doppelganger" is much more common (all over the Internet) than the correct words. :(
     
  13. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    That's very strange. Perhaps I have to change a browser setting. It did not seem to make a difference.
    Check here:

    Link

    "Variant" means that it's accepted but not preferred. In books, usually you will see the umlaut.

    Gaer
     
  14. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Or maybe it's me who has to change the settings. :eek:

    THAT sounds good. I don't like editors (publishers?) who don't use umlauts or accents. For example in German, we often see "Klichee" or "Cliche" instead of "Chliché". :eek:
     
  15. MrMagoo

    MrMagoo Senior Member

    Westphalia, Germany
    Westphalia, Germany; German
    "Doppelgaenger" doesn't bother me either, I just always wonder about the disappearance of e. ;)

    Theres not a big problem with "Doppelganger" at all, as it'd be pronounced almost the same.
    But "Fraulein" [au] of course doesn't sound the same as "Fräulein" [oy].
    In this case I guess, it's the avoidance of having three vowels in a row (Fraeulein - only topped by Baeuerin *lol*).
     
  16. MrMagoo

    MrMagoo Senior Member

    Westphalia, Germany
    Westphalia, Germany; German
    Or "Portmonee" instead of "Portemonnaie" :confused:
    "Klischee" kann ich noch irgendwo nachvollziehen, aber "Portmonee"? Nein, danke, dann doch lieber "Geldbörse". ;)
     
  17. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    You are right, because people don't know how to pronounce the "a" in the first place. Have you heard how the English say "Hamburg"? It sounds just like "hambuger" (what you eat in the US). :)

    Regardless, I think it's just plain sloppy and lazy to leave out the proper accents if you can find them, and that's the biggest problem. I use a macro program to give me all the accents I need in any language I have so far typed. :)

    Gaer
     
  18. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Sagst du wirklich Geldbörse? Ich meine, das kann man scheiben (kein dass! ;)), aber ausgesprochen wird es dann doch eher Portmonnee (wäre ja noch schöner!), aber ehrlich gesagt finde ich da die alte Rechtscheibungsregeln besser: In der Originalversion schreiben! ;)
     
  19. MrMagoo

    MrMagoo Senior Member

    Westphalia, Germany
    Westphalia, Germany; German
    :warn: nur, weil dies gerade zu unserem anderen Thread paßt:
    "Ich meine, daß man das schreiben kann" (mit "daß"! ;) )

    Schön, daß Du bzgl. der Rechtschreibung mal mit mir übereinstimmst. :)
    "Geldbörse" sage ich natürlich nicht - wohl kaum jemand; wenn überhaupt ein deutsches Wort gebraucht wird, dann ist es allerhöchstens "Brieftasche" und selbst das würde ich wahrscheinlich nur benutzen, wenn ich im Fundbüro anrufen müßte, weil ich selbige verloren habe. Kurzum: Klar sage ich Portemonnaie, um in der Schriftsprache aber ein "Portmonee" zu vermeiden, schreibe ich im Notfall lieber Geldbörse oder Brieftasche.

    -MrMagoo
     
  20. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Bitte? Ich würde es ohne "dass" sagen, aber nicht schreiben. ;)

    Auch hier kann ich getrost mit dir mitgehen, obwohl ich, wenn ich den Duden in greifbarer Näher habe, auch auf "Portemonnaie" zurückgreifen würde, wobei "Portmonee" die neue Nebenform ist, d.h. beide gelten in der neuen, aber nur Potemonnaie in der alten rechtschreibung. Außerdem hat der Duden sogar als Definition "Börse" angegeben. Nimmt man dies wörtlich, so habe ich aber noch kein Portemonnaie bzgl. des Dax gesehen. ;)
     
  21. MrMagoo

    MrMagoo Senior Member

    Westphalia, Germany
    Westphalia, Germany; German
    Nein nein, das war keine Korrektur - man kann beides schreiben und sagen, sowohl mit als auch ohne "daß".
    Ich hatte auch mit "daß" tippen wollen, sorry! ;)
     
  22. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Na ja, ich kann dir gerade noch mal verzeihen. :D ;)
     

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