24K a year, provide for ten years...

lapot

Senior Member
Hello, I'm watching the series "Breaking Bad" and I've got a problem with a sentence. A man is explaining to another one the money he needs.
He's dying and he wants to leave some money for his family.

24K a year, provide for, say, ten years, that's $240,000. That's what I need.

What is the meaning here for "provide for"? I'm not sure about what it means here.
Can anyone enlighten me? Thanks!!
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you change 'provide' to 'provided' the phrase becomes grammatical but it still doesn't make sense. Have you missed out the beginning of the sentence?

    What was the dialog before this?
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    It would make perfect sense with "provided": "[I want] $24K a year [to be] provided [to me] for, say, ten years; that's $240,000."
     

    lapot

    Senior Member
    The whole monologue is:

    Two kids, four years of college, $360,000. Remaing mortgage on the home, $107,000. Home equity line, 30 thousand. That's 137 thousand. Cost of living, food, clothing, utilities... say two grand a month. I mean, that should put a dent in it, anyway. 24K a year, provide for, say, ten years. That's $240,000. Plus 360, plus 137: $737,000. That is what I need.
     
    Last edited:

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The whole monologue is:

    Two kids, four years of college, $360,000. Remaing mortgage on the home, $107,000. Home equity line, 30 thousand. That's 137 thousand. Cost of living, food, clothing, utilities... say two grand a month, and that should put a dent in it, anyway. 24K a year, provide for, say, ten years. That's $240,000. Plus 360, plus 137: $737,000. That is what I need.
    That makes more sense to me.

    24K a year [pause] provide for, say, ten years, that's $240,000. That's what I need.

    In other words:

    24K a year - I need to provide that for, say, ten years...

    i.e.

    I need to provide 24K for ten years - that's $240,000.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Thanks for the added context, lapot. I listened to the monologue, and you're right, he does say "provide." In this context, I think it is the speaker (Walter White) who must "provide" the money; he's sort of reading off a checklist of things he must do or pay for. That's why "provide" isn't inflected; it operates as a sort of instruction to himself.

    That's how I interpreted it, anyway.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks for the added context, lapot. I listened to the monologue, and you're right, he does say "provide." In this context, I think it is the speaker (Walter White) who must "provide" the money; he's sort of reading off a checklist of things he must do or pay for. That's why "provide" isn't inflected; it operates as a sort of instruction to himself.

    That's how I interpreted it, anyway.
    Then we agree.
     
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