3/4 and several times that

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yuranos

Senior Member
Ukrainian, Russian
Hi there!
It's a piece of an article "5 ways to keep your rockstar employees happy" I found on LinkedIn.
I'm not suspicious about the ending of the sentence. Is there some comma missing or something else? I mean: what does 3/4 has to do with the last of the sentence?
The loss of star performers like Jill doesn’t just leave a talent vacuum to fill; it also leaves a gaping hole in the bottom line. Indeed, a recent article in the Wall Street Journal calculated that it typically costs a company about half a position’s annual salary to recruit for that job ¾ and several times that if the position requires rare skills.

Thanks!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The way I would read it if I thought it were correct: ... it typically costs a company about half a position’s annual salary to recruit for that job -- or three-quarters or several times more than that if the position requires rare skills.

    But it's so poorly worded -- even the numbers are odd, going from three-quarters to "several times more than that (more than three-quarters of the annual salary, or more than the annual salary?), and the ¾ is so out of place -- that I wonder if the "¾" isn't meant to be a dash: ... about half a position’s annual salary to recruit for that job – and several times that if the position requires rare skills.
     

    yuranos

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian, Russian
    Thank you Copyright! I think that 3/4 is a dash since I've met quite a few of these further in the text. I should have just read on...
     
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