3 hours faster / earlier

< Previous | Next >

fdk47

Senior Member
Tagalog
If you take the train, it will take you 5 hours to get there.
If you take the bus, it will take you 8 hours to get there.

What do you say to compare the train and the bus in this situation?

I thought of saying "The train is 3 hours faster than the bus." but not sure if that is something a native speaker would say, because faster sounds better when you use a word such as mile per hour.

If not, could you tell me how you would say it?

Thank you.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I suggest this version if you must compare the two travel times in one sentence: It will take you eight hours to get there by bus, but only five hours to get there by train.
     

    fdk47

    Senior Member
    Tagalog
    Thank you, owlman5 and Parla. How wrong does the sentence in OP "The train is 3 hours faster than the bus." sound to native speakers? Totally wrong, somewhat strange, or it might be possible but not your preference??
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome. That sentence sounds fine to me, FDK, but it isn't very informative if we don't know how long it takes the bus to arrive.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    [...] I thought of saying "The train is 3 hours faster than the bus." but not sure if that is something a native speaker would say, because faster sounds better when you use a word such as miles per hour. [...]
    Some native speakers might say it. I wouldn't, for the very reason you've given, fdk: "fast" refers to speed; "3 hours" is an amount of time.

    I would naturally say "The train takes 3 hours less than the bus" — and if you think about it, that echoes your own words: "it will take you 5 hours ... / 8 hours ...".

    Ws:)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top