3 years and 6months - Three years and half or

mochacoffee

Member
Korean
Hi all,

How could I describe 3 years and 6months?

I have worked in this company for three and a half years or three years and a half or three and half years or three years and half...

Please let me know, I already had a look at the dictionary, not much explanation.

Thanks,
 
  • Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Usually people seem to use three and a half years (but it might not make sense as it's "half a year"...but overall it's plural...?)

    Edit: three years and a half is also used, again not sure if it is grammatically correct or not...

    Interesting question!:)
     

    Vektus

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would use "three years and a half" or "three and a half years" (the first variant is more pleasant to my ear, but I can't explain why). Or, if you fill in the questionnaire, it will be possible to write it down in months, not years.
     

    DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I think there might be a difference between UK and US preferences.

    To my ear, BE users would be much more likely to say "Three and a half years."
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    I think there might be a difference between UK and US preferences.

    To my ear, BE users would be much more likely to say "Three and a half years."
    Interesting! It seem that is more common in the US also (depends on region); was guessing that "three years and a half" would be more British...
     

    mochacoffee

    Member
    Korean
    Should it be Three and half years? Half should be "A half?"... When you say half an hour, you don't put "A". Thanks all for the comments.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Language does not do what it should do: it does what it does. [Numeral] and a half is the usual collocation; [numeral] and half is not.

    The consonant combination ndh is not an easy one; and nor are its simplified alternatives (try saying six 'n' half after twelve and a half beers).

    Then maybe the dactylic rhythm +--+ sounds more pleasing to more people than than the trochaic +-+. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(prosody) It is, after all, the signature rhythm of one of the best know bits of classical music, the opening notes of Beethoven's fifth symphony. Will I ever be able to hear that music again without hearing one-and-a-half, one-and-a-half?
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Interesting! It seem that is more common in the US also (depends on region); was guessing that "three years and a half" would be more British...
    Nope, maybe it is more Russian, the native language of the only person saying they prefer it! I would always say three and a half years.
     

    Vektus

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Nope, maybe it is more Russian, the native language of the only person saying they prefer it! I would always say three and a half years.
    No, in Russian the only normal order is "three and a half years". We never change the words' places in this case (maybe only in poetry to follow the rythm, and it will sound too pompous). But in English, as I can see, both will work.

    OR it's my mistake if I want to sound British :)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    But you are not a native speaker, and your view is not supported by natives who all find one far more natural than the other. Even allowing for the idea that both are "possible" one is much better than the other. You say you prefer the "wrong" one, so it is not very good advice for the original poster!
     

    Vektus

    Senior Member
    Russian
    suzi br, I'm not arguing. A native speaker's opinion always stands higher. :)
    The expression I offered seemed very natural to me, and I didn't know it might be wrong - I tried to do my best. But now I have some idea of the real things and will possibly change my mind. I'm not insisting on my preference - of course, it can be wrong as I'm not a native.)
     
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