31 July

Listenever

Senior Member
Korean
Investigations continue into the break-in at Gringotts on 31 July . . .
(Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone)

The audio book reader says ‘thirty one July.’ Then can we read it two ways: (1) thirty first July and (2) thirty one July?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    No. There's only the one way to say it: the thirty first of July.

    ADDED
    : By which I mean, I think it is incorrect to say: 'thirty one July'
     
    Last edited:

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    As I pointed out in another recent thread, "thirty-one July" is the way it would be read in a military context. However, I would expect civilians to read it as "the thirty-first of July" or "July thirty-first."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As I pointed out in another recent thread, "thirty-one July" is the way it would be read in a military context. However, I would expect civilians to read it as "the thirty-first of July" or "July thirty-first."
    This is quite correct where American usage is concerned -- and not just in the military. It's widely used in various technical disciplines, e.g. aviation. Those of us with a background in such areas tend to use it in the general case (I'm among the "guilty.:eek: )

    In other words, "thirty-one July" would not raise eyebrows on this side of the pond. :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I have to disagree with Mr Graham on this one. I think "thirty-one July" would sound rather strange to most folks with no military or technical background and that an audio-book reader ought to say "the thirty-first of July".
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You can look at post #41 in this thread on saying and reading dates.
    I think the narrator is reading a headline in the newspaper (The Daily Prophet) - quite probably the reader is reading "verbatim" to avoid anyone complaining about exactly how the letters and numbers are often transformed by adding -th or -st and inserting the word "the", rearranging the word order, etc.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Well, sd, WRF is very much an international forum, and the population of countries using principally D-M-Y is about 3400 million, while for M-D-Y it's under 400 million. Maybe Mike thought of that when he set up the date format.:thumbsup:

    Ws:)
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't mind dates being written in different formats but hate the ambiguity of numerical forms like: 3/7/13 in international contexts.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Which is why it's often recommended to write the month in letters (at least three), which is usually decipherable in most Roman-alphabet languages ... but it's not often done! (Or to use the ISO yyyy-mm-dd, which might catch on sometime in the next century.;))

    Ws:)
     
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