5/5 nm

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
Would it be okay to read "Space/Line = 5/5 nm" as "the space-line ratio was (or, is) five by five nano meters"?

Hiro
 
  • Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Hi, HSS.

    It looks like it might be okay, but we would need more context to be able to say for sure.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The use of a slash ("/") to mean "by" is unusual. If you mean a square with length 5nm on each side, that would usually be written 5x5nm. Using a slash for this will confuse readers.

    Other than that, I agree with Nunty: we need more context. If this is the standard style in a specific professional field, you should use it, but then you should tell us what field this is about.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hi, this is about circuit patterning. You see conductive lines running around on a tiny board, and this particular designation tells us a ratio of the widths of lines to those of the distances. Apart from that, by the way, how would you read it? Is it always 'slash'?
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Thank you for the context. A slash is one way of indicating ratios. I was taught to read it as "to": a 5/5 ratio would be a five to five ratio.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Could it be 'five nano meters to five nano meters' or even 'five to five nano meters'?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Ratios are absolute numbers - they have no units.

    The usual separator for a ratio is a colon -> 5:5

    "Space:Line = 5:5" however, this is an imperfect ratio as the ratio is actually, 1:1

    What you are describing is not a ratio; it is comparative widths, so
    "There is 5nm between the lines, which themselves are 5nm wide."
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Ratios are absolute numbers - they have no units.

    The usual separator for a ratio is a colon -> 5:5

    "Space:Line = 5:5" however, this is an imperfect ratio as the ratio is actually, 1:1

    What you are describing is not a ratio; it is comparative widths, so
    "There is 5nm between the lines, which themselves are 5nm wide."
    Yes, you are right, Paul. It's not a ratio. I'll take it back. Is there any way to literally read "Space/Line = 5/5 nm"?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Have you seen this written somewhere? Or did you write this? (You know, source/context etc). The search I did has such things acompanied by "pattern" or "spacing" etc. Are you planning to read it aloud to communicate to others? Will it be accompanied by other (con)text?

    (nanometre/nanometer is one word not two!)
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The notation you suggest is related to typesetting notation, but it's different. In typesetting, the notation "12/16" means to use 12-point type on lines spaced 16 points apart. However, there's a difference: the 16 points is the total line spacing, baseline to baseline, including the height of the text - so, if all the letters were 12 points tall, there would be 4 points space between the bottom of one and the top of the one below it. You seem to mean only the space between lines, not including the width of the lines themselves. In typesetting notation, that would be 5/10.

    I urge you not to borrow this notation. It's from another field, you're using it differently, and circuit layout engineers will not (in my experience) have any idea what it means. I'd write "5nm lines with 5nm spacing between them." If you will have to say this many times, you can use a more compact notation - but, if you do that, define it first.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Have you seen this written somewhere? Or did you write this? (You know, source/context etc). The search I did has such things acompanied by "pattern" or "spacing" etc. Are you planning to read it aloud to communicate to others? Will it be accompanied by other (con)text?

    (nanometre/nanometer is one word not two!)
    I saw this in an academic conference for organic device engineering, but then it was written by a non-native speaker of English. (And the speaker was talking about how precisely the new processing technique can fabricate devices)
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    The notation you suggest is related to typesetting notation, but it's different. In typesetting, the notation "12/16" means to use 12-point type on lines spaced 16 points apart. However, there's a difference: the 16 points is the total line spacing, baseline to baseline, including the height of the text - so, if all the letters were 12 points tall, there would be 4 points space between the bottom of one and the top of the one below it. You seem to mean only the space between lines, not including the width of the lines themselves. In typesetting notation, that would be 5/10.

    I urge you not to borrow this notation. It's from another field, you're using it differently, and circuit layout engineers will not (in my experience) have any idea what it means. I'd write "5nm lines with 5nm spacing between them." If you will have to say this many times, you can use a more compact notation - but, if you do that, define it first.
    Thanks for the new knowledge, Egmont. Much appreciated!:)
     
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