5 p.m. or five o'clock

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LucianU

Member
Romanian
Hi, everyone!

Which one do Americans mostly use in general and in an office setting?

Thanks,
Lucian
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hello LucianU,

    Your question is, in colloquial AE, big enough to drive a truck through. Make that a convoy of large trucks.

    Both are widely used. If you give us a specific example sentence, together with full context, we might usefully comment about a preference and a reason for it.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Both are common, but in general? Probably "five o'clock":

    John leaves work every day at 5 o'clock.
    I have a five o'clock class today.
    The meeting ended at five o'clock.
    We always take the five o'clock train together.
     

    LucianU

    Member
    Romanian
    Hi, cuchuflete,

    I don't have one specific sentence because there are multiple situations. Can you tell me if one is more formal than the other?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I do not detect a difference in register for 5 p.m. and five o'clock. Both are used in formal settings, as well as in standard speech and writing. In more colloquial English, one may say "at five", leaving off both o'clock and p.m.
     
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