5 years on / 5 years later

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Cappucino

Member
Japanese
Hello!
I'd like to know the meaning of "4 years on" in the title of the introduction of a book's new edition.
The title is "Introduction to the new edition: 4 years on."

I'm wondering whether it means the same thing as "4 years later" as the first edition of the book was published 4 years ago. Or "after 4 years"? "4 years over"? Or does "4 years on" have a specific meaning different from all these alternatives?

I'd appreciate it very much if someone could kindly help me on this.
Thank you!
 
  • kool-wind

    Senior Member
    British English
    "4 years on" does mean that 4 years have passed since something else happened (the first edition of a book in this example) so in that sense it could be understood as 'after' or 'later', but there is a nuance.

    To me it carries with it a stonger feeling of things having been accomplished or evolving in the intervening period rather than the simple passing of time.

    (By the way, is it 4 years or 5? :confused:)
     

    Cappucino

    Member
    Japanese
    Dear kool-wind,

    Thank you very much for your kind advice.
    I've got your point very well. I needed this type of thought about "nuance" for my better understanding.
    Would you say that "4 years on" in this context means something like "now that 4 years have passed (...)"?

    I'd highly appreciate your further comment. Thanking you! ;)
    (Sorry, yes, it's "4 years on" not "5 years on." :p)
     

    kool-wind

    Senior Member
    British English
    Good morning Cappucino!

    Yes, I think that "now that 4 years have passed…" paraphrases very well "4 years on". :thumbsup:
     
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