$500 on the dog.

JuriTerreni

Senior Member
Chinese-China
From series<Lodge 49>,
A owns a pawn shop, but he also offers loans to people. B comes to the shop.
A - To cover?
B - No. Moneyline. $500 on the dog.
A - To beat the reigning Pac-12 champion?

What does " on the dog" mean? Thank you.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    There must be some previous dialogue for A to ask "to cover?", which is a different type of bet from a moneyline. As LC says, B wants to bet on the dog to win.
     

    JuriTerreni

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    There must be some previous dialogue for A to ask "to cover?", which is a different type of bet from a moneyline. As LC says, B wants to bet on the dog to win.
    No, the scene starts with this dialogue. I know he's betting, but what I don't understand is the dog part, is this a real dog? I thought PAC-12 was a football league?
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    “Dog” here almost certainly means “underdog,” the team considered more likely to lose. “Money line” means he is betting on them to actually win the game, not just beat the predicted point spread.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    “Dog” here almost certainly means “underdog,” the team considered more likely to lose.
    That would make sense. I wondered about the "dog" part since, although PAC-12 appears to cover many sports, dog racing isn't among them, and I don't recall ever having heard of dog racing in America. Since dog racing is still moderately common in Britain, "dog" isn't used to mean "underdog" over here, that I am aware of.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I don't recall ever having heard of dog racing in America.
    Greyhound racing seems to be declining in popularity, but there are a lot of tracks left. See: Greyhounds Dog Racing Tracks, USA

    The PAC-12 athletic conference (Pacific Athletic Conference) includes the University of Washington, where the athletic teams have the nickname, Huskies. (The husky is a breed of dog)

    I have no idea whether that has relevance to this context.
    1569182476294.png
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The "betting" sports at the college level are football and basketball (specifically men's basketball, as far as I know. I haven't heard of big-time betting on women's basketball).

    Those are the two sports everyone cares about enough to bet on in large numbers. The consensus estimate for betting just on the end-of-the-year college basketball tournament is $8 - $10 billion. The tournament lasts about three weeks.

    The number I read for college football was $5 billion for the year. That might be low.

    Those are the sports a bookie will take bets on. (Besides owning the pawn shop, the man is a bookie, apparently.) I agree that dog must mean "underdog".

    What Does Underdog Mean In Sports Betting?

    The underdog in sports betting is the team or individual that the odds suggest is less likely to win the game. Puppy and dog are two other slang words that refer to the underdog. You can have an underdog in any betting situation with at least two teams involved where you are somehow concerned with which teams wins, or how much teams win by - pointspread, moneyline, some exotics and so on.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Two points:

    1) No one would ever say “on the dog” to mean betting on the Huskies. They might say “the dogs,” but I don’t think it’s likely.

    2) There is nothing to suggest that the speaker is betting on a PAC-12 team. He’s betting against last year’s PAC-12 champion, who could be playing any team from any conference.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top