5'O clock {standard writing style}

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Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
Good morning teachers,

At 5'o clock sharp, Adrienne left the hospital.
At 5'O clock sharp, Adrienne left the hospital.
At 5 o' clock sharp, Adrienne left the hospital.
At 5 O' clock sharp, Adrienne left the hospital.

What is the standard way of writing this?

Please enlighten me on that,

Thanks a lot
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The apostrophe goes between "o" (which is not capitalized) and "clock": five o'clock. The term o'clock is a contraction for the now archaic phrase "of the clock."

    This information would have been readily available in any dictionary.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    The apostrophe goes between "o" (which is not capitalized) and "clock": five o'clock. The term o'clock is a contraction for the now archaic phrase "of the clock."

    This information would have been readily available in any dictionary.
    Would it be also correct if there's a space between apostrophe and "clock"? See my #3 above for example.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Would it be also correct if there's a space between apostrophe and "clock"? See my #3 above for example.
    No. The standard way to write it is five o'clock. When we use an apostrophe to indicate letters have been removed, we do not insert a space. We write "didn't" and not "didn' t," for example.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I googled your example sentence and found that it was from an online dictionary, which uses o'clock correctly. I'm puzzled by your thinking that it might be wrong, and to see that you suggested four options without including that one in your list. Why ask us to verify a dictionary entry?
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    I googled your example sentence and found that it was from an online dictionary, which uses o'clock correctly. I'm puzzled by your thinking that it might be wrong, and to see that you suggested four options without including that one in your list. Why ask us to verify a dictionary entry?
    With all due respect to you, I have never seen "o'clock" used before in my life; believe me. (Perhaps this is because I'm not too older in age)
    I have always seen apostrophe used before "O" (and "O" being capitalized), like this: 4'O clock.
    When I saw that in that dictionary, I was amazed - because I have noticed that some people put apostrophe before "o", others put it after "o"; Similarly some capitalize "o"; some don't. (And I sure have observed these things, perhaps by some non-native speakers who don't know much about the standard English usage - I'm not lying to you!)
    This is why I wanted to be sure as to which method is the only standard one.:)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    With all due respect to you, I have never seen "o'clock" used before in my life; believe me. (Perhaps this is because I'm not too older in age)
    I have always seen apostrophe used before "O" (and "O" being capitalized), like this: 4'O clock.
    When I saw that in that dictionary, I was amazed - because I have noticed that some people put apostrophe before "o", others put it after "o"; Similarly some capitalize "o"; some don't. (And I sure have observed these things, perhaps by some non-native speakers who don't know much about the standard English usage - I'm not lying to you!)
    This is why I wanted to be sure as to which method is the only standard one.:)
    If you can tell where you have always seen " X'O clock", it will help us and others learn where that form is used. I have never seen it, nor, it seems, have others.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    I agree with the posters above: the correct form is definitely five o'clock.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    With all due respect to you, I have never seen "o'clock" used before in my life;
    How very peculiar. For my part, that is the only way I have ever seen it used in my life -- and being both considerably older than you are, and a native speaker of English, I do not begin to doubt that I have seen it far more often than you have.

    I have always seen apostrophe used before "O" (and "O" being capitalized), like this: 4'O clock.
    Really? I hope you will not be offended if I tell you that I find that difficult to believe. Can you show us some examples of this truly bizarre (and thoroughly wrong) usage that you say is the only one you have seen?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Lun, remember that o'clock stands for 'of the clock', and the apostrophe is used to represent one or more omitted letters and there is no reason to capitalise of. When we try to represent a pronunciation where the consonant is not sounded, we write o' as in 'some o' that'. We also write will-o'-the-wisp.

    Do you know the children's game, 'What's the time, Mr Wolf?' Have a look at the representation of the time here, for instance: What's the time, Mr Wolf? - Wikipedia
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Lun, you had doubts - otherwise you would not have opened this thread. Could you not find "o'clock" in the dictionary? Perhaps you didn't look. But in that case, where did you find your OP sentence? I hope you aren't playing with us.:D

    And how come you used the correct form yourself just the other day, having been corrected by two other members?
    "four" vs "four o'clock"

    And here:
    arrive/reach
     
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