60 foot across

liquorice

Senior Member
Italian
Hi everybody,
in a city guide about Lisbon I found this sentence:

-The uniform feeling was also achieved by strict measurement of the streets: 60 foot across for those running up the grid north to south, 40 foot across for those crossing west to east

The context is the description of a quarter which is designed with a grid system.
60 foot across: does it mean 60 foot large or 60 foot long?

Thank you very much for your help
 
  • bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi everybody,
    in a city guide about Lisbon I found this sentence:

    -The uniform feeling was also achieved by strict measurement of the streets: 60 foot across for those running up the grid north to south, 40 foot across for those crossing west to east

    The context is the description of a quarter which is designed with a grid system.
    60 foot across: does it mean 60 foot large or 60 foot long?

    Thank you very much for your help
    It either means both, or neither! North to south is top to bottom, West to East is side to side.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hello liquorice,

    It means 60 feet from side to side. In normal AE, this would be said as sixty feet across, but in colloquial speech you will also hear it with foot instead of feet. I don't know about BE usage. This is apparently from an English publication, and though I don't know if the author is English, that might be a fair assumption.

    Lisbon, city of the sea: a history

    By Malcolm Jack
     
    Last edited:

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In answer to Chu's comment, yes in Britain (in my region at least) we say foot instead of feet for measurements. Personally, I am 5 foot 1. I don't know why we do this! We do it with weight too, I'd say I'm 7 stone (I wish!) rather than 7 stones. Also, my friend recently had a 7 pound baby (not 7 pounds).
     
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