7 o'clock vs 19:00

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bambina-in-nero

Senior Member
Italian
When you want to say 7 o' clock, but in the evening, not in the morning, how do you say that?
7 o clock pm is fine?
Would it be possible to say 19:00?

Thanks
 
  • Thelb4

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I can't speak for the Americans, but they very rarely use the 24-hour time, to the point that many of them don't understand it.

    In Britain, while it may be common to see '19:00' written, people nevertheless speak with the 12-hour clock, unless one is giving a precise time.
    "at seven o'clock" may be fine in context, however if it's unclear whether one is referring to morning or evening, one would say "seven [o'clock] in the evening" or "seven [o'clock] pm".
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...Would it be possible to say 19:00?
    This form is rare in the U.S., outside the military and a few other specialized areas. If you said "Let's have dinner at nineteen," people would think you are strange (or European, if they had some experience with European time descriptions and detected an accent in your speech).

    When it is used, at least in the military, it is written without a colon and is read as "nineteen hundred hours."
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    The 24 hour clock is almost never used in British English. It is used on our clocks, but that's a different thing to using it in language. It is used in written communication such as signs with opening hours, but it would not be used in any sort of quality literature, in fact not even a tabloid newspaper (unless it was in a table form) and it is almost never used in speech.

    Saying to someone 'I'll meet you at 19 o'clock' would recieve a very strange look. Like in the USA, we would only say '19 hundred hours', and then only if we were pretending to be a member of the military.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    When you want to say 7 o' clock, but in the evening, not in the morning, how do you say that?
    7 o clock pm is fine?
    Would it be possible to say 19:00?
    Neither I nor the style guide used by virtually all U.S. newspapers accede to the use of the wordy and ambiguous "o'clock."

    Just say 7 p.m. in the U.S., although many of us deal quite nicely with the 24-hour clock these days.

    For example, United Airlines (either the largest or second-largest U.S. carrier) issues all its flight schedules on the 24-hour clock.
     
    Last edited:

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    In AmE, "19 hundred" in place of 7 p.m. is used in hospitals quite often, too, so as to ensure that there's no confusion over whether something's supposed to happen in the morning or the evening.

    I actually use the 24-hour format a lot, but then, I'm weird. Really. I never use it when I'm telling someone else the time, though - I just have my clocks set on the 24-hour format so that I never, for example, set an alarm for 6 p.m. when I meant to make it 6 a.m.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...For example, United Airlines (either the largest or second-largest U.S. carrier) issues all its flight schedules on the 24-hour clock.
    However, just to prove that we Yanks are an inconsistent lot, American Airlines uses a 12-hour clock with "AM/PM," and Delta uses a 12-hour clock with standard type for AM and boldface type for PM. (Both the PDF timetables I just checked are a few months old; either or both may have changed since.)
     
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