___ right of the picture

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Chinese Su

Senior Member
Chinese
1. Are the two people ____ the right (of the picture) brothers?
2. Are the two people ____ the right side (of the picture) brothers?
3. Are the two people ____ the right-hand side (of the picture) brothers?

Q1: Can we use all these prepositions to fill the gaps? ON/AT/IN? Will the meaning remain the same?

Q2: Are there other ways to express the same thing,in addition to 1, 2 and 3?

Thank you :)
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    1. Are the two people on the right (of the picture) brothers? :tick:
    2. Are the two people ____ the right side (of the picture) brothers? :cross:
    3. Are the two people on the right-hand side (of the picture) brothers? :tick:
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I see! Thank you both, Keith Bradford :D and DonnyB :D

    1. Are the two people ON the right (of the picture) brothers?
    3. Are the two people ON the right-hand side (of the picture) brothers?

    Is it possible to replace ON with AT or IN, as suggested in

    On/in the left of the picture -- inside the frame.

    on the left of the picture

    On and at are generally synonymous in this situation, although there are situations where only on is permissible, such as "On the right side of the hall" or "On the right side of the road."

    on the right, on the right-hand side, on the side of something
     
    Last edited:

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I would say "on" but I wouldn't be surprised to come across "at" instead.

    I don't think "in" works there.
     

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would say "on" but I wouldn't be surprised to come across "at" instead.

    I don't think "in" works there.
    Thank you so much :D

    Then the following are both correct, right? (although 'on' is more common)

    1. Are the two people ON/AT the right (of the picture) brothers?
    3. Are the two people ON/AT the right-hand side (of the picture) brothers?
     

    ilse71

    New Member
    German
    On the left of the picture is a man with a top hat.
    At/to the left of the picture is a receptionist behind a desk.
    Accidentally, I came across this thread and have now a question concerning the two quoted sentences.
    Why don´t we need to follow the SPO rule here?
    I always thought of constructions like:
    On the left of the picture, there is a man with a top hat. OR
    On the left of the picture, a man with a top hat can be seen. OR
    On the left of the picture, you can see a man with a top hat.
    Thank you very much for an explanation.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Welcome to the forum! :)
    Accidentally, I came across this thread and have now a question concerning the two quoted sentences.
    Why don´t we need to follow the SPO rule here?
    I always thought of constructions like:
    On the left of the picture, there is a man with a top hat. OR
    On the left of the picture, a man with a top hat can be seen. OR
    On the left of the picture, you can see a man with a top hat.
    Thank you very much for an explanation.
    Sorry, but what is "the SPO rule", please, and who says we need to follow it? :confused:
     

    ilse71

    New Member
    German
    Thank you for replying to my question and sorry for confusing you.
    The SPO rule is a rule every German school kid is taught in English classes referring to the strict word order in English sentences.
    Subject - Predicate - Object (if necessary)
    And yes, all the teachers say one has to follow it. :))
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    In that case, every German school kid is taught wrong. But didn't you notice that your teacher had his fingers crossed behind his back? That sort of "universal" rule is what is taught to first-year students. As you get older you learn the exceptions.
     

    ilse71

    New Member
    German
    So the exception is here that when we start a sentence with a kind of "location" (On the right etc.), we don´t need a subject?
    Well, really interesting! Thank you very much.
    (refers to the exceptions mentioned by Keith Bradford)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I mean (in response to #16) that fronting an adverbial of place is quite commonplace, as is leaving the object in question to be “understood”:

    On the left [of the picture] is a man with a top hat
    The man with a top hat is on the left [of the picture]
    Inside [the box] is a hat
    The hat is inside [the box]
     

    ilse71

    New Member
    German
    Fronting an adverbial of place and leaving out the object is absolutely no problem for me.
    The problem I´ve got is why you can first write the verb (is) and only after it the subject (a man/ a hat).
    I´ve read about inversion, but in other situations.
    Do you think inversion after adverbials of place is quite informal?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the square there are lots of people. :tick:
    In the square are lots of people. :tick:
    In the square lots of people are. :cross:
    In the square lots of people are milling about. :tick:
     
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