AをBのようにして

thetazuo

Senior Member
Chinese - China
ポケットからカロリーメイトを出してしゃがんで差し出すと、アメは器用に前足を両手のようにして受け取る。「えらい!」と、がつがつと食べる背中に声をかける

Hi. For the bold part, is A を B のようにして a fixed pattern that is the same as A を B にして which means “use A as B”?

By the way, does the underlined part mean “I said to the back of アメ (name of the cat)”, which is the same as に言う?
Thank you.
 
  • thetazuo

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thank you, Sola-san.
    A を B のようにして使う is a fixed pattern which means "use A like B."
    A を B して使う is a fixed pattern which means “use A as B.”
    A を B にして使う is a fixed pattern which means “use A as B," "use A instead of B," "use A, regarding A as B."
    But why do you add 使う? Doesn’t A を B のようにして already mean "use A like B."?
     

    thetazuo

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thank you again.
    I'm sorry, but I don't understand.

    AをBのようにして演奏する =play A as B
    葉っぱを笛のようにして演奏する

    AをBのようにしてもてなす=treat A as B
    乞食を、王様のようにしてもてなす

    AをBのようにしてかざる=decorate A as B
    石ころを宝物のようにして飾る
    Sorry for not being clear. But your examples are not parallel with my op example. In your pattern AをBのようにして+verb, A is the object of the verb. But in my example, 前足 is not the object of 受け取る, whose object should be カロリーメイト.
    That’s why I think A を B のようにして might be the same as A を B にして. So my sentence in question should mean “the cat received my calorie mate using his forepaws as if they were two hands”. Does it make sense?
     

    Yokozuna

    Member
    Japanese
    >Doesn’t A を B のようにして already mean "use A like B."?
    That is right in this case, '前足を両手のようにする' makes sense, and equals " use its forepaws as its hands."
    But in general, 'A を B のようにする' just means 'treat A like B.'
    If you put 前足 in A and 両手 in B, it means 'use 前足 as 両手,' because it's obvious what you do with 両手 is to use them.
    But if you put other words in A and B, 'ようにする' doesn't always mean 'use.'

    前足を両手のようにして使うis also correct and almost the same as 前足を両手のようにする, but it puts more emphasis on "using" .
    And in your example, 前足を両手のようにして(カロリーメイトを)受け取る, you cannot use two objects for one verb 'して(する).'
    Also, 'して' alone doesn't mean receiving an object, so you need another verb 受け取る.

    '前足を両手にする' is not correct formally; it sounds like the cat really changed its forepaws into hands.
    Some Japanese people might use前足を両手にするin daily conversation, but 前足を両手のようにする sounds more natural.

    >“I said to the back of アメ (name of the cat),” which is the same as に言う?
    Yes, 'に声をかける' is almost the same as に言う.
    But 'に言う' is a little bit broader, just means 'say something to.'

    We use '声をかける,'
    1. When we start talking to.
    2. When we invite somebody for something (ex. for lunch).
    3. When we give somebody a greeting or cheering.
    The core meaning of '声をかける' is No.1.
    No.2 and No.3 are its derivatives.
    I think the No.3 suits your case.
     
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