A / Á

harald

Member
The Netherlands, Dutch
Hi, I am republishing a book in Spanish. I have two versions of the original one from 1891, the other from 1897.
These two don't always agree on spelling.
In this case Á / A:
The whole sentence is:
Á una aguja ó á un alfiler bien secos, el agua les moja, pero con menor adherencia, muchísimo menor que al vidrio; pues bien, supongamos que se logra colocar uno de esos objetos sobre la superficie del agua con tal habilidad que los moje lo menos posible...
There are more places where this is going on in the book.
Is this a change in spelling between 1891 and 1897? (I see no difference in the spelling of the word 'á' when it is not capitalised.
All help appreciated!
 
  • Csalrais

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    La última edición del diccionario de la RAE en la que aparecía a con tilde es la de 1899, así que es de suponer que en la edición posterior (1897) de ese libro ya habían seguido la tendencia que llevó a la desaparición de este uso.

    Saludos
     
    Last edited:

    harald

    Member
    The Netherlands, Dutch
    What surprises me is that the accent vanishes off the capital A before it is dropped from the á.
     

    Wandering JJ

    Senior Member
    British English
    What surprises me is that the accent vanishes off the capital A before it is dropped from the á.
    That's probably because typewriters became pretty well standardised around the year 1900 and they weren't capable of taking any accent above the top of an uppercase letter - the mechanism did not permit marks to reach those dizzy heights. To place an accent on a lower case letter, on the other hand, did not require the mechanism to perform a high jump so there was no need to remove á until spelling reform chose so to do.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    No doubt your text has accents on the monosyllabic preterits: fué, vió, dió. That accent didn't disappear until the 1950s.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top