a 100% free file hosting = a hundred percent free file host

< Previous | Next >
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. Or at least, "100%" does mean "a hundred percent". Though whether the whole sentence is true, and not a bit of misleading marketing, is another matter.:)
     
    Yes. Or at least, "100%" does mean "a hundred percent". Though whether the whole sentence is true, and not a bit of misleading marketing, is another matter.:)
    But I saw you have said that ""100%" does mean "a hundred percent" and you haven't said that a 100%" does mean "a hundred percent". Doesn't an indefinite article go with file hosting & sharing solution or go with hundred percent/ 100 %. That was my question.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "A" goes with "solution" -- everything else is just description. It's a solution for file sharing hosting and sharing that is 100% free.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, OK. In this sentence the 'a' goes with 'free file hosting and sharing solution'.

    Elsewhere we would usually refer to '100%', in written words or speech, as 'a hundred percent' or 'one hundred percent'.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Then here I don't need to put a hyphen "a 100% - free - file hosting & sharing solution = [Website name] is a hundred percent - free - file hosting & sharing solution"?
    A [100% free] [file hosting & sharing] solution. No hyphen because it's generally understood that 100% and free go together; and I suppose another consideration is that %- looks a little odd together.
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    What do you quite mean? Were you meaning we should use "a hundred percent" instead of " 100%"?
    I mean that the combination of the percentage sign and the hyphen looks a little odd: 100%-free. And it's really not necessary: people understand what "100% free" means and they will put those two together mentally, even without the hyphen.
     
    I mean that the combination of the percentage sign and the hyphen looks a little odd: 100%-free. And it's really not necessary: people understand what "100% free" means and they will put those two together mentally, even without the hyphen.
    Does this apply to ""Gmail Drive" Programme creates a 7 GB - virtual drive." Or we should say "Gmail Drive" Programme creates a 7- GB - virtual drive?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top