a 1000-miles away trip or a trip of 1000 miles away?

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
<<What is correct: a 1000-miles away trip or a trip of 1000 miles away?>>

When I must use the preposition "of" and when I mustn't?

Thanks!

(Inserted the phrase the question is about into the opening post. -- JustKate, English Only moderator)
 
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  • Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    And am I right that when something is away, it is away from here ?
    I mean, a 1000 miles away trip is a trip that is located 1000 miles away from where we are, which I think could have sense only in some really specific and peculiar context, if anywhere:confused:
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    If that's what you want to say (and if so I'd completely misunderstood Gabriel's original post!) then you'd say:

    A trip a thousand miles away (from here). This could even be, say, "a ten-mile trip, a thousand miles away (from here)" and the meaning would be quite clear.
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes, thank you, Keith, that's what I understood about being away. So if one is talking about a trip that is 1000 miles long, then a 1000 miles away trip is not correct (or can lead to a misunderstanding)
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    As Keith said, it would be "a trip a thousand miles away," not "a thousand miles away trip."

    And I read your example as "a one thousand miles away trip," which is definitely wrong.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yes, thank you, Keith, that's what I understood about being away. So if one is talking about a trip that is 1000 miles long, then a 1000 miles away trip is not correct (or can lead to a misunderstanding)
    It's simply not correct. I rarely say that, but in this case I'll stick my neck out and say it. :)
     
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