A 90s girl...joins the ranks of 3S Lady

Status
Not open for further replies.

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Background: It is a translation by me of an excerpt of the statement (or advertisement?) of a Chinese girl hunting for husband.

As 90s, I'm now here seeking my marraige. Unwittingly I've joined the ranks of 3S Lady. I look not bad in my own opinion, and, cold outside, heat inside.<............................>

********************************

The question of this thread: 3S typically stands for single, seventies and stuck. But here the girl was born in about 1990-93. So she's 90s, not 70s. Do I use "3S Lady" correctly here?
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I have never heard of the term "3S Lady," and would not understand it. Even your explanation is confusing: I would presume "seventies" means that she was between 70 and 79 years of age.

    For translation advice, you are better off posting your question in the Chinese forum.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I have never heard of the term "3S Lady," and would not understand it. Even your explanation is confusing: I would presume "seventies" means that she was between 70 and 79 years of age.

    For translation advice, you are better off posting your question in the Chinese forum.
    Same response here - I don't think these terms are used in English :eek:
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Okay. Looks like the definition from the Urban Dictionary is a disaster:

    3S lady, on the words, that's say it become old age and didnot get married yet.

    The actually meaning : Single, Seventies, and Stuck.

    Especially in big city , more and more girls join in the line of 3S Lady. they earn more money .but no time to consider their own feelings and love, and no time to seek their boy friends.

    Source
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    It is certainly a disaster in terms of grammar, and was clearly not written by a native English speaker.

    It's hard to see how the phrase "3S Lady" could be used in Chinese, as it's based on English and the English alphabet. If you want to use it, you will have to explain what it means, and expect many women to be offended.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Well, thank you. Time to kick away these Chinglish.

    But how do you describe a single, relative young woman (age 27 to 31)? English "spinster" is offensive and for middle and old aged unmarried women.

    For translation advice, you are better off posting your question in the Chinese forum.
    I'm sorry. There are very, very few, almost none, people there who could do the job.
     
    Last edited:

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    But how do you describe a single, relative young woman (age 27 to 31)?
    A young, single woman.
    A single woman of that age group is hardly "stuck". There are millions of women nowadays who get married (for the first time) when they're well into their thirties.
    But here the girl was born in about 1990-93.
    Someone born in 1993 would be 24 or 25 today, hardly an age to start worrying about becoming a spinster.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Someone born in 1993 would be 24 or 25 today, hardly an age to start worrying about becoming a spinster.
    What about those born in 1990? They are 27 to 28. "Big-aged" and "left over" as Chinese saying goes.

    Well, I don't know Western standard here. But there is a Chinese proverb: A 30-year-old man is a blooming flower while a 30-year-old woman is scum. Unfair for women, yes? But it is reality of today's China. So aging 27-28 is highly challenging for single women in this country.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    What you call "As 90s" we call "a person born in the 90s" (born 1990-1999). Without "born" it makes no sense in English: we don't talk about people by the year (or decade) they were born in.

    A more common description would be "woman in her late 20s". That means age 27-29.

    Age is different in English-speaking countries: it is years completed. For example, if you were born on October 1, 1990 then:
    - on Sept 30, 2018 you are "27 years old" (but "almost 28")
    - on Oct 1, 2018 you are "28 years old"
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Informative. Thank you.

    The expression "Unwittingly I've joined the ranks of big-aged, still single women", while being Chinglish, tends to be self-effacing.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Okay. Thanks for the feedback.

    Does "leftover ladies" work? Ladies appear to have too broad age range. (I got "leftover ladies" from Chinese English learning sites)

    A girl aged 26-29 who says she's been leftover is deemed both self-effacing and down-to-earth in manner.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I think there is a culture clash. Things that make sense (in English or Chinese) in China, don't make sense in the US or UK. Our culture is different. "Leftover ladies" makes no sense to me (except it is clearly insulting).

    The concept is familiar to us: many US women think that age 18-26 is their "prime marriage years" and their "prime child-bearing years" (where "prime" means "best"). These women (or their mothers) may worry if they are older than that and unmarried. That has been true for centuries, but is less true in the last 40 years, because the "women's liberation" social movement has changed the thinking of everyone.

    We use the expression "past his prime" or "past her prime", but there is much confusion about what years that "prime" is. Many people who are older than 50 will insist "I am still in my prime".
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    But how do you describe a single, relatively young woman (age 27 to 31)?
    I describe her in terms relevant to an actual context and other things that she does without any reference to her marital status. Say, musician or teacher or neighbour or neice.

    I think this obsession with whether a woman is married or not is very culturally specific. It’s going out of focus in the UK. It seems, from what you are saying, it’s alive and kicking in China.

    If the context is specifically related to talking about single women, the old phrase “on the shelf” is probably still usable in general terms, but not in the context of an advert describing yourself on a dating site.

    From my understanding of this thread “3S” has some meaning, but it’s hard to position it in a sentence. Maybe: “I’ve joined the ranks of the 3S ladies” (Certainly not lady because ranks are lots of people). Or I’ve slipped into being a 3S lady.

    However, I cannot advise you about whether the term 3S can be used for women not actually born in the Seventies! It’s possible it could become the generic term, but I don’t know.

    By the way:
    Big aged :cross: No! This is not a way to describe anyone’s age.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    This discussion has, it seems, digressed considerably from the original starting point of the phrase "the ranks of 3S Lady", and I'm therefore now closing the thread. Thanks to everyone for their contributions, which I hope NewAmerica has found useful. DonnyB - moderator.
     
    Status
    Not open for further replies.
    < Previous | Next >
    Top