a a

  • Ana_Fi

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Voy a aprender.

    Can you give an example explaying why you think you need two a's? I don't think you can write to a's together.
     

    eldimmo

    Member
    British English
    Thanks for your reply Ana.

    Here are some examples taken from
    'google.es.. páginas de España '

    Voy a a tener que viajar bastante y me gustaría saber .......
    Ahora voy a a opinar sobre este televisor que tengo instalado ..........
    Os voy a a hablar de un cava seco reserva de las.............
    entonces voy a a exigir que me remuneren por............


    Thanks again
    Ed
     

    Jellby

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Here are some examples taken from
    'google.es.. páginas de España '
    All are wrong. Probably just typing mistakes, it's fairly common to have short (or even long) words duplicated by mistake.
     

    Cecilio

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Valencian/Catalan
    There can be another explanation for these mistakes. Maybe some translators, including some machine translators, apply a rule according to which a Spanish infinitive corresponds to an English "to" infinitive, therefore the error. I have sometimes heard English-speakers making a similar mistake when trying to speak Spanish. They translate the "to" infinitive as some sort of "a" + infinitive. For example: *"Yo quiero a saber". That's obviously wrong, an example of bad translation.
     

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Thanks for your reply Ana.

    Here are some examples taken from
    'google.es.. páginas de España '

    Voy a a tener que viajar bastante y me gustaría saber .......
    Ahora voy a a opinar sobre este televisor que tengo instalado ..........
    Os voy a a hablar de un cava seco reserva de las.............
    entonces voy a a exigir que me remuneren por............


    Thanks again
    Ed
    All wrong. Those are blogs, right? don't pay much attention to what those people write, they usually make a lot of mistakes. I found one where the person wrote 'més' with an accent, several times, so it wasn't a typo, and 'mes' doesn't have an accent.
    ;)
     

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    There can be another explanation for these mistakes. Maybe some translators, including some machine translators, apply a rule according to which a Spanish infinitive corresponds to an English "to" infinitive, therefore the error. I have sometimes heard English-speakers making a similar mistake when trying to speak Spanish. They translate the "to" infinitive as some sort of "a" + infinitive. For example: *"Yo quiero a saber". That's obviously wrong, an example of bad translation.
    I don't think this time you can blame the translation programs. I think these were blogs. People make lots of mistakes there. Some are typos, some are not.. :p

    It wouldn't make sense that the program would translate it with two 'a' if the version in English doesn't have two 'to'. It would make sense in your sentence: 'yo quiero a saber'.. but 'yo quiero a a saber'? I don't think any program would do that.

    In any case, it's very strange because no matter how badly some native Spanish speaking people may speak, they would never use two 'a' there. Or maybe.. you never know..:rolleyes:
     

    mazbook

    Senior Member
    United States/México, English
    Obviously, the a a +verb was written by a native English speaker. In English, with only a few exceptions, the infinitive is always written as to +verb, which would translate (totally incorrectly) as a +verbo in Spanish.

    Saludos desde Mazatlán
     

    mazbook

    Senior Member
    United States/México, English
    Also, although the form of the future tense using the verb to go is very similar and easy to remember) in English and Spanish, they ARE different. The English form is "to be (conjugated) +going +infinitive, e.g., "He is going to run."

    The Spanish version is "ir (conjugated) +a +infinitive, e.g., «Va a correr.»

    Saludos desde Mazatlán
     

    Cecilio

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Valencian/Catalan
    I don't think this time you can blame the translation programs. I think these were blogs. People make lots of mistakes there. Some are typos, some are not.. :p

    It wouldn't make sense that the program would translate it with two 'a' if the version in English doesn't have two 'to'. It would make sense in your sentence: 'yo quiero a saber'.. but 'yo quiero a a saber'? I don't think any program would do that.

    In any case, it's very strange because no matter how badly some native Spanish speaking people may speak, they would never use two 'a' there. Or maybe.. you never know..:rolleyes:
    Eldimmo's example was "voy a aprender". We have two things:

    - the structure "ir a". (="to be going to")

    - the verb "aprender". (="to learn")

    Maybe the presence of this preposition "a" could cause the machine or the human translator some problems.
     

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Eldimmo's example was "voy a aprender". We have two things:

    - the structure "ir a". (="to be going to")

    - the verb "aprender". (="to learn")

    Maybe the presence of this preposition "a" could cause the machine or the human translator some problems.
    Ok. In any case, I think that by now Eldimmo knows that's not correct:)
     

    eldimmo

    Member
    British English
    I want to thank you all for your contributions .

    In this case " a a " I had some sort of "mental block" and that this construction may exist in some sort of
    "archaic " way or the like.

    Without the 'benefit' of a "classroom teacher" this forum is a fantastic way of resolving issues of comprehension however trite and seemingly trivial.

    Thank you all again for your help.
    Ed
     
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