A along with B guarantee(s) [singular or plural?]

simmetria

Member
Polish
This one should be pretty easy for natives:

A along with B guarantee(s) the best results.

Is the phrase "A along with B" plural or singular?

I would go for "plural" but I just want to be sure.
 
  • simmetria

    Member
    Polish
    Oh I see. I guess it poses the same problem as in my language. Maybe both of them are correct and they differ only in emphasis.
     

    Doofy

    Member
    English - US
    A good question indeed! Even the New York Times seems to go both ways on this one:

    "Along with Paul Rudnick, Mr. Beane is American theater’s best living exponent of the exploding epigram...."

    "But the bad reputation of the Afghan police forces, in particular, along with the spotty performance of Afghan forces in Marja, suggest that the work and the spending of billions of American dollars to date had not achieved anything like the desired effects."

    The first example clearly could not be plural. It seems to me that the second one could be singular.
     

    atsamo

    Senior Member
    Polish
    This one should be pretty easy for natives:

    A along with B guarantee(s) the best results.

    Is the phrase "A along with B" plural or singular?

    I would go for "plural" but I just want to be sure.
    Hi,

    In my opinion, A along with B means a condition (state) which guarantees the best result.
     

    simmetria

    Member
    Polish
    Why would it be a state? What about:

    A along with B go fishing every other week. They love it.
    Along with A, B is one of the biggest fans of fishing.

    Plus have a look at Doofy's examples. It's just a question of what we understand as a subject (theoretically) and what we want to stress (in practice).
     
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    atsamo

    Senior Member
    Polish
    A big government spending (A) along with the tax cut (B) creates a huge budget deficit.
     
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    Doofy

    Member
    English - US
    I think I'd go singular in most cases. In that longer NY Times sentence, I think the use of plural could be an editing mistake. (Although still perfectly understandable)

    A along with B go fishing every other week. They love it.
    You wouldn't say this. You'd say, "Bob and Ray go fishing every week." Or possibly, "Bob goes along with Ray on his weekly fishing trips."
     

    simmetria

    Member
    Polish
    Thanks for you replies Doofy. Can I ask what you think of "as well as"? Does it bear any resemblance to "along with" in a sense that can be confusing as far as singular and plural forms are concerned?
     
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