A and B are essentially the same word

forgoodorill

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, everyone!
I read a book named The glamour of Grammar recently, there's a sentence really confused me:

"Glamour" and "Grammar" are essentially the same word.

This is a sentence the author quoted from other's book( So these two words use " " rather than ' '?) And what's the behind meaning of 'essentially' in this sentence? or what's the meaning the author wanted to convey by this word 'essentially'? I think it's from one special perspective to look at the two words-from an essential manner? I don't know if it's true, I have this thought because I remember a book I have read said native speaker could vividly felt the difference between the meaning behind the changing of word forms.

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm sorry, forgoodorill, I'm not sure I understand your question. Your source also quotes the explanatory sentences that follow the statement "Glamour" and "Grammar" are essentially the same word:
    In classical Greek and Latin, ‘grammar’… covered the whole of arts and letters, i.e. higher knowledge in general. In the Middle Ages, ‘grammar’ was generally used to mean ‘learning,’ which at the time included, at least in the popular imagination, a knowledge of magic. The narrowing of ‘grammar’ to mean the rules of language was a much later development …​
    Meanwhile, ‘grammar’ had percolated into Scottish English … where an ‘l’ was substituted for an ‘r’ and the word eventually became ‘glamour,’ used to mean … knowledge of magic and spells.​
    (Ewan Morris, The Word Detective, quoted in Clark, The Glamour of Grammar)
     

    forgoodorill

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I'm sorry, forgoodorill, I'm not sure I understand your question. Your source also quotes the explanatory sentences that follow the statement "Glamour" and "Grammar" are essentially the same word:
    In classical Greek and Latin, ‘grammar’… covered the whole of arts and letters, i.e. higher knowledge in general. In the Middle Ages, ‘grammar’ was generally used to mean ‘learning,’ which at the time included, at least in the popular imagination, a knowledge of magic. The narrowing of ‘grammar’ to mean the rules of language was a much later development …​
    Meanwhile, ‘grammar’ had percolated into Scottish English … where an ‘l’ was substituted for an ‘r’ and the word eventually became ‘glamour,’ used to mean … knowledge of magic and spells.​
    (Ewan Morris, The Word Detective, quoted in Clark, The Glamour of Grammar)
    Thanks, Loob. I edited this question: what's the meaning the author wanted to convey by this word 'essentially'? kind of like what's the notion of 'essentially' ( it's not the meaning that I could consult the dictionary, it's the question why this author choose the word 'essentially' rather than 'essential')

    Sorry, my English sucks. Hope you could understand it!
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The idea is just that "glamour" and "grammar" are, at base, the same word: they started off as one word then developed into two.

    (And your English doesn't suck!)

    cross-posted:)
     

    forgoodorill

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Because one is an adverb and the other an adjective, and the context requires an adverb. It modifies the meaning of "are" and means "in essence".
    Thanks, so what's the difference between 'essential' and 'essentially', one is describe manner, another is aspect? Thanks!
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I would say that "essentially" (adverb) is a free modifier - it modifies the entire sentence. Essential is an adjective and cannot do this. Adjectives are attributives, predicates, or used, absolutely, as substantives.
     

    forgoodorill

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The idea is just that "glamour" and "grammar" are, at base, the same word: they started off as one word then developed into two.

    (And your English doesn't suck!)

    cross-posted:)
    Thanks for your help, Loob! And also thanks for your encouragement.
     

    forgoodorill

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would say that "essentially" (adverb) is a free modifier - it modifies the entire sentence. Essential is an adjective and cannot do this. Adjectives are attributives, predicates, or used, absolutely, as substantives.
    Thanks,PaulQ. It maybe sounds like adverb tell us how, when, where etc. sth is done( This should be 'is done' or' be done'?) And adjective tell us sth like other things?
    By the way, I like your signature.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It maybe sounds like adverb tell us how, when, where etc. sth something is done
    :thumbsup: Adverbs add information to verbs (and adjectives and gerunds) "He quietly walked to the door." ("He bought the amazingly expensive car." "Driving quickly can be dangerous.")
    And adjectives ...?
    Adjectives tell us more about nouns,noun phrases/clauses, pronouns, etc. "He was a tall man and his dog was big ."
    (This should Should this be 'is done' or' be done'?)
    Please note the word order in questions. -> "is done" is correct.
    sth is done... tell us sth like other things?
    Please use "something" not "sth". :thumbsup:
     

    forgoodorill

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    :thumbsup: Adverbs add information to verbs (and adjectives and gerunds) "He quietly walked to the door." ("He bought the amazingly expensive car." "Driving quickly can be dangerous.")

    Adjectives tell us more about nouns,noun phrases/clauses, pronouns, etc. "He was a tall man and his dog was big ."
    Please note the word order in questions. -> "is done" is correct.
    Please use "something" not "sth". :thumbsup:
    Thanks, PaulQ. I learned so much from your reply!
     
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