A and B did a and b, respectively

Suzuka51

Senior Member
Japanese
I saw this sentence in an English text for TOEIC.

This sentence is given as a problem and set as a part of memo to Animation staff in the animation company.

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I understand that many of you will probably feel tired and overworked, but you will all be duly compensated at bonus time for any extra tasks you take on.

Before I continue, I should thank
Melinda Rosen and Karl Huttenmeister, who have been doing voice acting work on the GD Pet Food advertisements and the engineering video, respectively. Despite the heavy workload in the visual effects section, the two invested their time in voice acting lessons at a local college prior to making their first attempts in this field.
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I thought the sentence meant,
Melinda Rosen has been doing voice acting work on the GD Pet Food advertisements, and
Karl Huttenmeister has been doing the engineering video.

But it means,
both Melinda Rosen and Karl Huttenmeister have been doing voice acting work in different projects.

I think if you say "A and B did a and b, respectively", you mean "A did a and B did b", but in which case can I not say like that as the red sentence means?
And did the red sentence mean both did engineering video like this?
Both Melinda Rosen and Karl Huttenmeister have been doing voice acting work and (have been doing) the engineering video in different projects.

Also, what "engineering video"?
 
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  • Bongone

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    What you give in red is not a sentence. It reads more like a caption to a photo.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Can you tell us exactly where you've got that red passage from, please?

    Because as it stands, I'd have read "respectively" as meaning that they both did voice-overs but Melinda did the pet food ad and Karl did the engineering video. :confused:
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I thought the sentence meant,
    Melinda Rosen has been doing voice acting work on the GD Pet Food advertisements, and
    Karl Huttenmeister has been doing the engineering video.
    It does:):thumbsup:

    Please be aware that quite a lot of native speakers of English don't know what respectively means ... but use it anyway:mad::eek::rolleyes:

    EDIT: Yes, as Donny says, both have been doing voice-over work, but on different videos.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I thought the sentence meant,
    Melinda Rosen has been doing voice acting work on the GD Pet Food advertisements, and
    Karl Huttenmeister has been doing the engineering video.
    I agree with the others. It does.
    But it means,
    both Melinda Rosen and Karl Huttenmeister have been doing voice acting work in different projects
    No "but". It does. They have both been doing voice acting work in different projects. Melinda has been doing voice acting for the GD pet food project. Karl has been doing voice acting in the engineering video project. They have both been doing voice acting, and those are different projects.

    Why do you think the text means that they have both been working on the same projects? From what you have told us there is no reason to believe the word "respectively" has been used incorrectly.
     

    Suzuka51

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Why do you think the text means that they have both been working on the same projects? From what you have told us there is no reason to believe the word "respectively" has been used incorrectly.
    Maybe because I do not know what "engineering video" is.
    I still do not know what it is, but I learned it needs voice acting like "GD Pet Food advertisements" now.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Maybe because I do not know what "engineering video" is.
    I still do not know what it is, but I learned it needs voice acting like "GD Pet Food advertisements" now.
    Ah...I see now. :)

    I would assume that someone had made a video about some aspect of engineering, but without any sound - just the pictures. Then they got Karl to add a spoken commentary (presumably to explain what was happening in the video) and that's generally known as a voice-over which they describe here as "voice acting".
     
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