a and b the c of d

  • uinni

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    TimeHP said:
    Hi all.
    I'd like to know if 'a and b the c of d' is a common sentence at present.
    Thanks.
    I guess you have been too generic.

    For sure there are verbs with which I can fill your pattern:

    "Go and see the ring of Kerry"...
    "Try and find the pill of happiness" (which is different from "try finding the pill of happiness", of course)...

    Uinni
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    If you mean this question literally, the answer is no, never, never heard of it.
    If you mean we should substitute something or other for a, b, c and d, you would need to explain more.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    panjandrum said:
    If you mean this question literally, the answer is no, never, never heard of it.
    If you mean we should substitute something or other for a, b, c and d, you would need to explain more.
    To my great surprise, the expression exists:
    Means Above and Beyond the Call of Duty. Means very good.
    That food was A and B the C of D.
    Source
    Jana
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Indeed - I see other references the same, now that I look. Amazing. From my very limited review of Google links, it may well be a common forum abbreviation.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, to answer the original question:

    NO, it is not a COMMON sentence.
    Nor is it a common usage in general.
    Although, we (AE) do occasionally use the long form (above and beyond the call of duty).
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    nycphotography said:
    Well, to answer the original question:

    NO, it is not a COMMON sentence.
    Nor is it a common usage in general.
    Although, we (AE) do occasionally use the long form (above and beyond the call of duty).
    I agree. The longer form sounds fine, but "a and b the c of d" sounds downright goofy.
     

    TimeHP

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Many thanks for your answers.
    The problem with languages is that sometimes one reads a word/sentence that sounds quite new and it's difficult to understand if it's a common on or if it has just arived from Mars...:)
    Ciao
     
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