A and B, which each HAVE something.

kachibi

Senior Member
Chinese
A grammar question: why after "each" which means either basketball or football, there is a "have" instead of "has" below?

Soccer is a 90 minute game split into two 45 minute halves. This is different than games like baseball, with its nine innings; basketball and football, which each have four quarters.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    The reason is that basketball and football are referred to together and therefore form a plural subject. However, you could say: Each of basketball and football has four quarters.

    I'm quite sure this topic has been discussed before. You should be able to find other threads with detailed explanations if you enter "each has have" in the search box.

    What's your source? I'd have used "from" instead of "than" here.
    This is different than games like baseball,
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Each can be an adjective or a pronoun. There are several threads on "each plural" but the first dictionary entry has

    adj.
    every one of a group of two or more members, considered individually or one by one:

    [before a singular countable noun]Each student has a different solution to the problem.
    [after a plural noun or pronoun]The students each have a different solution to the problem.

    pron.
    every one individually; each one:
    Each has a different solution to the problem.[~ + of + the/my/these/etc. + plural noun]
    Each of these students has a different solution to the problem.
     

    kachibi

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks. Now I am aware that "each" can be an adjective or a pronoun. So, when it is a pronoun, it goes with "is/has". No problem with this.

    But why "each" as an adjective can be used after the noun? How should I understand this adjective "each" in relation to other parts of the sentence especially "the students"?

    Isn't it strange to say: something+ adjective?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    English has picked up a variety of other languages and has some expressions and structures that are "unusual":) The word "both" can also be a pronoun or an adjective. I like them both. I like both of them. :)
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    How should I understand this adjective "each" in relation to other parts of the sentence especially "the students"?
    I'm not sure I've understood your question but these two sentences mean the same. They are just worded differently.
    Each student has a different solution to the problem.
    The students each have a different solution to the problem.


    Isn't it strange to say: something+ adjective?
    It may not be very common but I wouldn't call it strange.
     
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