a bag <which contains> <containing> my change of clothes

s21d

Senior Member
hindi
"I'll take along a bag which contains my change of clothes and other personal stuffs"

Kindly tell me if the above sentence is grammatically correct or not. I know containing should have been there in place of which contains. However if someone writes which contains will it be considered grammatically incorrect?
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Which contains" is correct, even though it's not as colloquial as "containing" (as you know). However, "stuff" is uncountable. It has (except perhaps in a few rare situations, which do not apply here) no plural. The bag contains your personal stuff.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    First, the corrections:
    I know containing should have been there in place of which contains.
    :cross:
    "I'll take along a bag, which contains my change of clothes and other personal stuffs stuff.":tick:
    "I'll take along a bag that contains my change of clothes and other personal stuffs stuff." :tick: Stuff is uncountable and never used in the plural.

    Both "I'll take along a bag, which contains my change of clothes" and "I'll take along a bag containing my change of clothes" are grammatically and idiomatically correct.

    which contains my change of clothes is a 'relative clause' qualifying "bag" - which is usually used in non-defining1 clauses; which is preceded by a comma, and the clause ends with a comma (but a lot of native speakers do not bother about this guidance.)
    that contains my change of clothes is a 'relative clause' qualifying "bag" - that is usually used in defining1 clauses (but a lot of native speakers do not bother about this guidance.)
    containing my change of clothes is a 'reduced relative clause' qualifying "bag"

    1 Relative clauses: defining and non-defining - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary
     
    Last edited:

    s21d

    Senior Member
    hindi
    First, the corrections::cross:
    "I'll take along a bag, which contains my change of clothes and other personal stuffs stuff.":tick:
    "I'll take along a bag that contains my change of clothes and other personal stuffs stuff." :tick: Stuff is uncountable and never used in the plural.

    Both "I'll take along a bag, which contains my change of clothes" and "I'll take along a bag containing my change of clothes" are grammatically and idiomatically correct.

    which contains my change of clothes is a relative clause qualifying "bag" - which is usually used in non-defining1 clauses; which is preceded by a comma, and the clause ends with a comma (but a lot of native speakers do not bother about this guidance.)
    that contains my change of clothes is a 'relative clause' qualifying "bag" - that is usually used in defining1 clauses (but a lot of native speakers do not bother about this guidance.)
    containing my change of clothes is a 'reduced relative clause' qualifying "bag"

    1 Relative clauses: defining and non-defining - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary
    Thank you paulQ
     

    s21d

    Senior Member
    hindi
    "Which contains" is correct, even though it's not as colloquial as "containing" (as you know). However, "stuff" is uncountable. It has (except perhaps in a few rare situations, which do not apply here) no plural. The bag contains your personal stuff.
    Thank you Egmont
     
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