a baked cake

Chigch

Senior Member
Mongolian
Just a simple question:

Is it possible for 'a baked cake' to be understood as 'a cake that has baked' as opposed to 'a cake that has been baked', in an appropriate context?
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    I don't really understand the difference you are trying to make.

    We always say: a cake that has been baked not 'has baked' on its own.

    The phrase 'a baked cake' would be understood, but I can't imagine a context in which you would use it because cakes are always baked – that's what a cake is: a baked product.
     

    Chigch

    Senior Member
    Mongolian
    The phrase 'a baked cake' would be understood, but I can't imagine a context in which you would use it because cakes are always baked – that's what a cake is: a baked product.
    For example, there are two cakes in front of you, one is baked, another unbaked, steamed, or made in some other particular ways. But you would like to try the baked one, but not the others.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    You could contrast 'baked' with 'unbaked' (not cooked yet).

    e.g. in a TV cookery programme, there's a bowl with the cake mixture in it and you say, 'Here's the unbaked cake'; and next to it is the finished cake and you say, 'Here's the baked cake.'

    But it is not a cake if it has been steamed or cooked by some other method (it would be a pudding or something else). As I say, by definition, a cake is baked.
     

    Chigch

    Senior Member
    Mongolian
    Thanks, Chez. It seems that there must be something that has a feature to be compared to that of the entity denoted by such a phrase, say, 'a baked cake'. Am I right?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    We can say "the cake is baking in the oven" and "the cake is baked"= "the cake is fully-baked". "The baked cake is cooling off in the oven." Here I would interpret "the baked cake" to mean "the fully-baked cake".

    We can also introduce the agent and say "My mother is baking a cake" and "the cake was baked by my mother".
    "My mother gave me a baked cake." This doesn't tell me that she baked it herself, but logically someone baked it. "My sister gave me a half-baked cake." "My brother gave me a collapsed cake."

    I really don't see the problem.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Some people use "self-baked" food, but I wouldn't; I think it sounds silly. We used to say "home-made", but now that food companies have started promoting "home-made" produce straight from their factories, it has begun to lose all meaning.
     

    Chigch

    Senior Member
    Mongolian
    Would 'self-made' sound to you like 'home-made' rather than 'a cake baked by itself'? We can imagine that there is a cake that was not baked by anyone, for example, in tales for kids.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    OK... The happy little cake jumped in the oven and it baked and it baked, and then out hopped the self-baked cake and jumped in a bucket of water to cool off. It sounds comic, but I would have to imagine a "self" for it too work. If the cake were not animated I don't think even kids would swallow that "self-baked" cake. For me "self-baked" means "baked by myself".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think this 'self-baked' is a translation from German which uses the equivalent and very similar word to refer to home made or home baked compared to shop bought and puts is before the noun. I haven't ever heard 'self-baked' actually. I'd always use a reflexive pronoun: 'I made it myself'. There are expressions like 'a self-made man' but that's different.
    Even the gingerbread man who jumped out of the oven and ran off as fast as he could was made by the farmer's wife.
     
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