a band with/of Abruptos' characteristics

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kubi77

Senior Member
Spanish
This belongs to a text that I'm writing. It mentions that due to the addictions, personalities...of the members of the rock band Abruptos, it was impossible for them to consolidate (maybe it should be "establish") a career. Should it be "with Abruptos' characteristics" or "of Abruptos' characteristics"?

Many thanks.

"It was clear that a band with/of Abruptos' characteristics was not going to be able to consolidate/establish a career."
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think I'd go for this:

    a band WITH ... was not able to ESTABLISH

    Unless they already HAD some sort of career in the industry, then you need consolidate.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Also, as discussed in several other threads here, the possessive form of the band name is "Abruptos's." (See St. James's Park on any map of central London for a better-known example.) The rules for forming a possessive don't change just because a singular noun happens to end in the letter s.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Ah, but is "Abruptos" singular? Could it not, like the Beatles, be plural, with each member being "an Abrupto"?
    Or perhaps the band's name is actually "Abrupto" and the OP misspelled Abrupto's as Abruptos'.

    I'm not convinced the Saxon genitive is ideal here; I think I'd rather write "with the characteristics of Abrupto" (or "of Abruptos", as the case may be).
    Even that is not very good, because it almost suggests one is talking about a band that is like Abrupto, but isn't Abrupto.
     

    kubi77

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks. The name of the band is "Abruptos". I always thought that when a word ended with "s", its possessive should be written "s'" (Briths English) but you live and learn!
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Thanks. The name of the band is "Abruptos". I always thought that when a word ended with "s", its possessive should be written "s'" (Briths English) but you live and learn!
    You're not the first person to have been confused about this point. Many native speakers are also.

    Some authorities use an apostrophe to form the plural of nouns ending in the letter s if, and only if, they also end in the "es" sound that characterizes plurals. Examples are Moses and Jesus (pronounced as in English, of course, not as in your native Spanish). They would refer to Moses' laws or Jesus' disciples. That exception doesn't apply to Abruptos.
     
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