a bang out of things

gvergara

Senior Member
Español
Hi there:

What does the sentence in bold mean? Thanks, see you

They each had their own room and all. They were both around seventy years old, or even more than that. They got a bang out of things, though _in a half-assed way, of course.
From "The catcher in the rye" by J. D. Salinger

Gonzalo
 
  • vdawg

    Member
    Hindustani, U.S. English
    To "get a bang out of" something means to really enjoy it.
    As in, "she'll get a bang out of our prank."
    It's a somewhat dated expression, not really used that much anymore.
    In context I would say it means the enjoyed life, (but in a half-assed way of course).
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Probably seen more often is "I get a kick out of something," as in the Cole Porter song " I get a kick out of you," meaning "you really thrill me." It does mean to really enjoy something, but the connotation is that you get a thrill from something; it really affects you.
     

    rossrov

    Member
    Catalan and Spanish
    "The Catcher in the Rye", second chapter.
    " They were both around seventy years old, or even more than that. They got a bang out of things ,though-in a haif-assed way, of course".
    Could you help me understand the meaning of "they got a bang out...
    until "of course"?.
     

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    "The Catcher in the Rye", second chapter.
    " They were both around seventy years old, or even more than that. They got a bang out of things ,though-in a haif-assed way, of course".
    Could you help me understand the meaning of "they got a bang out...
    until "of course"?.
    "tenían un montón de cosas, aunque todas eran una mierda!"
     
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