a bar of cigarette=a carton of cigarette

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jiamajia

Senior Member
Mandarin
I know ten packs of cigarettes make a carton. But someone told me today that we can also use 'bar' to replace 'carton'. Is that true? Just want to verify it. Thank you.
 
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  • jiamajia

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I've not heard bar before but I'm certainly not surprised that is used in some places, seems a reasonable way to say it.

    I bet Chinese English (Chinglish ) users may find it enticing, for they are taught the term like 'a bar of chocolate' in elementary schools and 'bar' is translated into a Chinese word 'tiao', which means 'long and slim shaped stuff'.
     

    jiamajia

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I've never heard this in my life.

    A carton of cigarettes to me means a pack of ten packets of 20 - 200 in all.

    Rover
    Just curious to ask, at a gas station or a convenience store, do we say a 'pack' or 'packet' to mean 'I want to buy 20 cigarettes ( one tenth of a carton)'?
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Just curious to ask, at a gas station or a convenience store, do we say a 'pack' or 'packet' to mean 'I want to buy 20 cigarettes ( one tenth of a carton)'?
    Yep :) Or you would also specify "10 <brand>".
    Actually, when you are in a shop you always state the brand here, because there are dozens of different types. I suppose it'd be possible to say "A packet of 10 <brand>" but it's a bit longwinded, I don't think most people would say the full thing, especially smokers, save as much breath as possible :p
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Another one here who's never heard of a 'bar' of cigarettes -- only a carton.
     

    catlady60

    Senior Member
    English-US (New York City)
    I bet Chinese English (Chinglish ) users may find it enticing, for they are taught the term like 'a bar of chocolate' in elementary schools and 'bar' is translated into a Chinese word 'tiao', which means 'long and slim shaped stuff'.
    We call it a pack of cigarettes instead of a bar because, unlike chocolate, we don't eat cigarettes! ;)
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    I don't buy cigarettes but I hear about them often enough to know that in the U.S.:

    It's a "pack of cigarettes," not "a pack of cigarette" or a "packet" of anything; someone selling them would figure out what you mean, but "packet" would sound strange.

    Several packs are sold together in a "carton. "Carton" is a general term for a usually rectangular package or box made of cardboard (which I think the British call something else; pasteboard? pressboard?). While a single pack of 20 cigarettes might be made of paper, not cardboard, to hold 10 packs a sturdier container is needed, so they are packed into a carton. I've never heard of bar, tube, or anything else for a set of cigarette packs sold together for a single price, except "carton."
     

    Astropolyp

    Senior Member
    Italian - Tuscany
    I've been told by a colleague of mine, here in West Sussex, that the most usual ways to ask for a pack and a carton of cigarettes are respectively "a pack of twenty" and "a pack of two hundred".

    Is that common in all UK, America and Australia?

    Thank you.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Here, a bar—whether of chocolate, metal, wood, or anything else—is a solid piece of something. A carton is a cardboard container, in this case the standard size and shape for cigarettes, which contains ten packs, each pack containing a standard 20 cigarettes. No carton would be referred to as a "bar".
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    I've been told by a colleague of mine, here in West Sussex, that the most usual ways to ask for a pack and a carton of cigarettes are respectively "a pack of twenty" and "a pack of two hundred".

    Is that common in all UK, America and Australia?

    Thank you.
    I don't buy cigarettes, but in the US I have never heard anyone ahead of me in line ask for "a pack of twenty" or "a pack of two hundred." American store clerks can't do math and wouldn't know what a "pack of 200" was.
    20 = "a pack"
    200 = "a carton" of 10 packs; 10 × 20 = 200
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    I've been told by a colleague of mine, here in West Sussex, that the most usual ways to ask for a pack and a carton of cigarettes are respectively "a pack of twenty" and "a pack of two hundred".

    Is that common in all UK, America and Australia?

    Thank you.
    Not in America. Cigarettes are normally sold in packs of 20 and cartons of 10 packs, i.e. 200. A clerk wouldn't recognize a request for a "pack" of 200. One asks for one or more packs, if less than 10, or one or more cartons.
     
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