A BAR V. SLAB of chocolate.

kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
Do English people use slab and bar interchangeably with the word chocolate?

I've got the feeling that a chocolate bar is more frequent, isn't it?

Or perhaps there's a size difference :confused:

Cheers
 
  • Eigenfunction

    Senior Member
    England - English
    You are correct, bar is more common. It is also more general I would say. I would only refer to a big lump of chocolate marked out in squares to be broken as a slab, whereas I would call said slab of chocolate a 'bar of chocolate' as well and I would also call something like a mars bar (or any similar shaped chocolate covered thing) a 'chocolate bar'.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    "Slab" would not be the every day word; it would be bar. Slab would tend to be used more descriptively, if you wanted to convey that a bar of chocolate was particularly slab-like. That is, I would not say to someone "Could you get me a slab of chocolate from the corner shop?" I would always say bar.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Thanks, I always thought that a slab was a rectangular bar -200-gram bar-, whereas a bar was used for Mars-shaped bars -long and thin-
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    So, I guess you use bar for the long and thin snacks, don't you?

    That was my original point, if everything is a bar, and I tell someone, could you please get me two bars of chocolate from the shops? I'd have to specify, whereas if you use two different words depending on shape, you know what they want, don't you?

     

    cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    So, I guess you use bar for the long and thin snacks, don't you?

    That was my original point, if everything is a bar, and I tell someone, could you please get me two bars of chocolate from the shops? I'd have to specify, whereas if you use two different words depending on shape, you know what they want, don't you?
    You can a chocolate bar from the shop - it is long and thin in shape, for example Mars bars, Snickers bars, Kit Kats, etc.

    Longer, flatter products are generally blocks of chocolate. I concur that "slab" is not a very usual word to describe any shape of chocolate! ;)
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    In NZ:

    A chocolate bar is something the size of a Moro, or a crunchie bar etc.

    A block of chocolate would be one of those big, flat packs of chocolate with little square divisions.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    That photo you linked to in post #7, Kule ... I'd call that a 'slab' of chocolate, or even a paving-stone of chocolate ~ it's huge!
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    A well-known chocolate company advertises "a glass and a half of full-cream milk in every 200g block".

    In Australia, a slab usually refers to a container of 24 cans of beer.
     

    Eigenfunction

    Senior Member
    England - English
    Note the difference (In BE at least) between a chocolate bar and a bar of chocolate. A chocolate bar is like a crunchie, mars etc. A bar of chocolate is the 200g with lines to break along sort.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    I knew there should be some difference between the two, Eigenfunction, because of the empty/full distinction there is when we talk about a coffee cup or a cup of coffee, etc for example.

    Thanks a lot
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    Another fascinating exercise on the differences in the use of words through the English-speaking world. For an Englishmen, slab or block would refer to something very big, like a paving slab (stone) or a block of flats. As for chocolate, Eigenfunction describes the BE usage perfectly.
     

    lablady

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    ... For an Englishmen, slab or block would refer to something very big, like a paving slab (stone) or a block of flats. ...
    There is a company in the U.S. that sells chocolate in large quantities, probably as a supplier to smaller candy-making shops. They offer a "slab" that weighs 11 pounds (5 kg)! Now, that's a lot of chocolate. :D

    I won't post a link to the site because I don't want to give the impression I'm promoting it, but if you google "chocolate slab" you will find several examples of its usage.

    I'm not sure how large a bar has to be before it becomes a slab. :)
     
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